Why choose Forest School Leadership Training with Circle of Life Rediscovery?

Forest School Training in East Sussex

Forest School Training in East Sussex.

Are you considering doing your Forest School training? Have you heard about Forest School but are not sure about taking the next step?

We asked our current cohort of Forest School Leader trainees about their experience of the training with Circle of Life Rediscovery, and what advice they would give to someone considering taking the next step and becoming a Forest School Leader.

Here are their responses…

(Initials have been used to protect identity, in brackets is the age group each trainee currently works with)

1. What made you want to do Forest School Training?

Forest School Training with Circle of Life RediscoveryB (Primary) – “I have always been interested in nature and have loved spending time outdoors since I was a child. Then having my own children, I was always looking for ways of getting them outside and interacting with the environment. After a big life change a couple of years ago I was looking for something to do alongside my classroom teaching and approached my head about doing the course.”

D (Secondary) – “A colleague had started Forest School training and said how great it was, I have always been in to outdoor learning etc, so had a look online and persuaded our school to start a Forest School.”

Y (Primary, Nursery and Secondary) – “I have always had a passion for the outdoors and have been delivering the Duke of Edinburgh, bush craft and outdoor team building activities for several years. It made sense to get a qualification in the area I enjoyed teaching in and one in which I am passionate about and has an impact on young people almost instantly.”

P (Freelance – Primary, Secondary, SEN) – “I have always had a strong interest in the natural world and as I work predominantly with young people it seemed the perfect way to enhance their appreciation of the world around them and gain a formal qualification.”

2. Why did you choose Circle of Life Rediscovery?

Forest School Training in East SussexB – “I was recommended it by someone who had already done the course. I liked the fact that it gave more than just the ‘facts’.”

R – “Friends had recommended it and it was local to me.”

D – “After looking into lots of different companies Circle of Life Rediscovery seemed to be the best fit with how the course was run.”

P – “Having worked with some of the Circle of Life Rediscovery instructors in the past I have always been impressed by their knowledge and ethos.”

3. Did the training live up to your expectations?

R – “Yes the training more than met my expectations. I felt that the syllabus was broken down well into: practical sessions, theory as part of the group and self study. The group were very good at documenting and sharing images etc, which made it easier when writing up.”

D – “The training really did, I learnt so much from the guys at Circle of Life Rediscovery and felt inspired to learn more and more, I spend most of my free time learning and practising skills now!”

P – “Yes very much so, it really opened up some new areas of interest for me. Coming from a Bush craft background it was great to expand on the elements of play, mindfulness and participant led discovery.”

4. How has your practice changed since the training?

R – “My organisation skills have improved. I feel more confident to observe and react to learning before interjecting. I feel more capable when demonstrating practical skills.”

D – “Before I started training I was in a classroom everyday, I rarely go into the school now. I work in our outside area all day everyday.”

Y – “More organised and not trying to cram too much into the sessions and allow it to be more child led.”

Forest School Training Level 3 with Circle of Life Rediscovery

 

5. What was the best thing about the training?

 

B – “Being around like minded people, the amazing settings for the training, the knowledge and support of the leaders.”

R – “I enjoyed the games and practical training. It was really useful to spend time being a student outdoors before being a leader with students! The day when Ringmer school came to the woods was probably the best as it was a consolidation of all the ideas and theory. I had a genuine sense that this was something I could do by the end of that day.”

D – “Learning so many new skills, like knots and whittling, plus a very friendly learning environment with a great group of people.”

Y – “I enjoyed all elements of the course including the course work as it helped identify I need to have a better knowledge of trees plants etc.”

6. What would your advice be for someone thinking about doing Forest School training?

B – “Definitely do it!”

R – “Try as many activities as possible as they will only scratch the surface of the possibilities when you begin responding to students. Make sure you document the sessions with photos and film as you will need them when it comes to writing up! Take a camera on walks to broaden your identification skills.”

D – “Go for it! Not much else I can say, if you enjoy working in a woodland environment and in the outdoors this is definitely training you should do!”

Y – “To give yourself the time to really concentrate on the course with as little distraction as possible. To complete parts of the course work as you go. Maybe some pre-course reading or identification of trees plants etc.”

P – “I would recommend it especially to those who already have an active interest in outdoor learning as well as to the complete novice. Leave your assumptions behind and soak everything up, you will learn more than you might expect, some of it about yourself.”

7. Do you have any other comments?

Join our unique Forest School Training Level 3!
B – “Would appreciate lots of CPD opportunities next year please!”

D – “I thoroughly enjoyed Forest School training with Circle of Life Rediscovery and the training really has had a massive impact on my life! I actually enjoy getting up to go into work!”

P – “Having done Forest School training in the past I was particularly impressed by the breadth and depth that Circle of Life Rediscovery practitioners bought to the whole experience. “


For more information on Forest School Training in East Sussex with Circle of Life Rediscovery see our website HERE. Please click here to read our FAQ’s.

We are running our next training course in 2018, starting on 5th March. Course dates are as follows:

Part one: March 5th – 8th 2018
Part two: April 23rd – 25th 2018
Part three: May 15th – 16th 2018

Book your place online HERE.

 

Circle of Life Rediscovery

www.circleofliferediscovery.com

01273 814226

info@circleofliferediscovery.com

 

Teenage Woodland Day, October 2017

Toffee Apples and Mythical Creatures

The Woodland Programme

October 23rd saw in the first session of the Teenage Woodland Programme. The new woodland season, which has been kindly funded by The People’s Projects in association with The Big Lottery Fund and ITV, will run from October 2017 to June 2018.

 

It’s exciting to begin the programme when the woodland is in such a great period of change. The leaves have turned from vivid green to burnt orange, mushrooms and toadstools strewn across the woodland floor and in the air, the smell that Autumn is in full swing.

Toffee apples on the fire!

It was a jam packed day, for both participants and the woodland team. The rain poured, but it didn’t dampen spirits. It was all happening from fire building, to toffee apple toasting, to wood carving utter knives and mythical creatures – a participant made a fabulous unicorn!

 

As the rain dripped down from the trees, with participants sat under the dry tarp, we were treated to a story from the newest member of the team, about Norse mythical creatures. Tea in hand, it was a wonderful way to bring the group back together after participants had been tending to their fires and making homemade toffee apples. Listen carefully when toasting an apple over a fire, its skin will blacken, but the sound that is produced is best described as though the apple is ‘screaming’. Eerie, but intriguing. I’m looking forward to hearing more tales and stories.

“I can’t express enough how much relaxing, healing and peace there has been for me today.” It was great to see so many participants join us on the day, new faces and old. My greatest wish is that everyone who came in October’s session, will join us in November’s session and so on. It’s such a unique project for Discovery College, and one which I believe holds a lot of energy and power.

 

For a young person who is struggling with their mental health to get out of the house is one thing, but for that young person to develop their skills and knowledge in a place that could soon become a familiar, safe space is another. I’m just so grateful for this funding as it enables us another opportunity to spread the word to young people who are struggling, that the woodland is a wonderful and magical place to be, and in the space that we hold in Vert Community Woods, full of kind and supportive people.

By Emma Thorne
CAMHS Peer Trainer

About the Woodland Programme

The Woodland Programme is aimed at young people aged 13-19 who are experiencing mental health difficulties.

Circle of Life Rediscovery

Circle of Life Rediscovery have been working alongside young people and CAMHS East Sussex (Discovery College) for 10 years co-developing nature-based days where teenagers can come along and be with other people who listen without judgement.

 

The programme will continue to run throughout the year ending in a camp in July. The woodland is a very calming and relaxing space, young people who have been before tell us it is very freeing. 

 

Circle of Life Rediscoverywww.circleofliferediscovery.com

01273 814226

info@circleofliferediscovery.com

Make it ‘Outdoor Classroom Day’ every day!

Ideas to inspire your Outdoor Learning this Autumn and Winter

Outdoor Classroom Day took place this year on 12th October 2017 with 19,800 schools getting involved and spending the day (or part of the day) learning outside the classroom with their pupils. This is an amazing collaborative effort, not just in the UK but across the World, with 2.3 million children across 105 countries taking part, quite an achievement for an initiative that started off just in London in 2012, as Empty Classroom Day.

…but shouldn’t this sort of outdoor learning be taking place every day, in every school across the world, even in the Autumn term?!

To help inspire you to get your class outside this Autumn, we have collected some simple ideas to use the natural resources around you for outdoor learning.

Waxed Autumn Leaves, outdoor learning with Circle of Life Rediscovery
Waxed Autumn Leaves


Taken from  ‘Learning with Nature’, by Marina Robb (Director of Circle of Life Rediscovery), Victoria Mew and Anna Richardson.

Discover outdoor learning with Learning with Nature

How to:
Waxed Autumn Leaves, ideas for outdoor learning this Autumn and Winter!

  • Gather many varieties of Autumn leaves, press and dry them in books or a flower press. The leaves take a few days to dry. Either prepare this part in advance, or see the gathering of the leaves as a separate activity.
  • Light a fire. Melt beeswax in a pan over the fire.
  • Take the pan off the fire and dip the leaves. To do so safely, hold the leaf stem and dip. Avoid immersing the fingers!
  • Take the leaf out of the wax, hold above the pan and immediately shake downwards to remove extra wax before it dries. Avoid shaking side to side as droplets of wax can go over clothing.
  • Blow the leaves gently to complete the drying.
  • The wax coating will help to preserve the leaves. They can be used for all sorts of crafts, and are especially lovely when threaded.

Create your own Environmental Art projects

Environmental Art

How to:

  • Collect fallen leaves of different colours and shapes
  • Be as creative as you like – create raindows, sunbursts, collages of animals, abstract art
  • Take inspiration from environmental artists like Andrew Goldsworthy or Nils-Udo

Twig Towers

Twig Towers!How to:

  • Collect a big pile of sticks
  • Divide your class in to groups
  • Set them the challenge – who can build the highest twig tower?
  • How can you measure which one is the tallest?
  • How many sticks did each tower use?
  • How could you use fewer sticks and still make the tallest tower?

 

For more ideas and inspiration did you know Circle of Life Rediscovery can come to your school to run bespoke Inset training in your school grounds, or you can bring your staff to our beautiful Sussex woodland site.

Contact us here for more details or call 01273 814226.

We also run CPD courses throughout the year on a number of different topics, please see our website for details.

Happy Outdoor Learning!
Katie Scanlan, Operations Manager, Circle of Life Rediscovery CIC.

Our Teenage Woodland Programme, by Emma Thorne

Grab your wellington boots, gather the kindling, and have those marshmallows toasting at the ready. Why I hear you say? Because the Teenage Woodland Days are back and I for one cannot wait.


At the beginning of 2017 Circle of Life Rediscovery in partnership with East Sussex CAMHS (Discovery College) successfully secured a grant from ITV’s The People’s Projects. This well earnt money will be used to fund the upcoming Teenage Woodland Days, as well CLR/CAMHS-LD/FISS Family days.

As a CAMHS Peer Trainer I feel very excited about the forthcoming project, particularly as I had such close involvement in spreading the word and rallying up the support for it through its stages of public voting. Yes, this Peer Trainer was even featured on ITV Meridian doing just that, although I will confess that the fame has yet to go to my head.

Asides from getting back out into the ever changing mystical woodland, I’m especially looking forward to working with the fantastically enthusiastic young people whom have been previously involved in woodland projects. Their continued energy and passion for being outdoors is wonderful to watch. But one thing that I’m really hoping for is that there will be some new faces on our Teenage Programme. The woodland welcomes all to its beautifully calm space and all you need is an open mind and an invitation to yourself to allow your senses to take in the wonder of nature and its beauty, as it changes throughout the seasons.

The weather is already beginning to change and soon it’ll become more apparent that Autumn is ready and waiting to announce its presence. The leaves will darken and fall to the ground and suddenly the annual childlike desire to crunch all over them underfoot becomes all too irresistible. The changing of the seasons is something that I’m most excited about in relation to the upcoming woodland days. The programme will run from September 2017 through to July 2018. All four seasons will be experienced over that period of time and I’m intrigued to watch how the woodland changes in its entirety.


So, are you between the ages of 13-19 and are experiencing mental health difficulties? Why not try something new, take an exploration into the heart of the woodland or simply unleash your inner Bear Grylls and start learning how to build a fire whilst cooking something delicious on it to enjoy.

Come along and you won’t be disappointed, although I cannot guarantee that you won’t get muddy – see you in the woods!

 

Weekend Dates:
2017
September 16thOctober 23rdNovember 18th,
2018
January 13thFebruary 3rdMarch 3rdApril 6thMay 19thJune 9th, July 7th & 8th.
Celebration Event
May 29th – all families & supporters welcome.

Where:
Mill Wood, Vert Woods Community Woodland, Park Lane, Laughton, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6BP (map available on request).

Times:
10am – 3.30pm.

Trainers:
Mark Lloyd, Rivkah Cummerson, Luke Funnel, Marina Robb and Emma Thorne.

How to sign up:
To register for a course all you or your supporter (relatives, friends and carers) need to do is:
Phone: 0300 303 8086
Email: sussex.recoverycollege@nhs.net or
Write: to Discovery College, Aldrington House, 35 New Church Road, Hove, BN3 4AG giving the titles of the courses you would like to attend and your address.

A registration from will then be sent to you by post for you to fill in. If you find completing the form is difficult for any reason, please call us to confirm you can attend the first session and come along with your form, so we can support you to complete it. We can do a home visit if you would find that helpful.

If you have any questions about registration please contact Rivkah Cummerson, CAMHS Participation Manager, tel:  07876 037478.

For any questions about the content of the programme please contact Mark Lloyd, Circle of Life Rediscovery, tel: 07961 015307.

 

A Day in the Life of a Wild Thing!

We meet at the car park, with our packed lunches and everyone is excited and maybe a bit nervous? I wonder what we will be doing today?

We wave goodbye to our families and disappear down the track, into the woods to find the Wild Things basecamp and begin the day’s adventures.

At basecamp we are shown around, we find out there is a toilet (phew!) and play some games to learn each other’s names. Then we mix up some natural materials to make paint (and a bit of snazzaroo) and create some tribal face paint – now we are truly Wild Things!

 

Then we are set our first challenge – can we learn some new knots and then build a rope bridge to get our whole team safely from one side of the ‘ravine’ to the other?

 

 

We can…and not only that but someone has the great idea to join our bridges together and we create an amazing low ropes course to play on. Everyone has a go and we get around the whole course without touching the ground.

 

 

 

 

After this it is time to try out some fire lighting and cooking. Our challenge now is to light a fire, without matches, and to keep the fire going long enough to cook some chocolate cake! We all look at each other and wonder how we will do this without an oven?!

 

 

Luckily, Jennie shows us how to use an orange and some tin foil and we are all able to make chocolate cake, and it even tastes quite nice…apart from the burnt bits!!

 

 

It is lunch time and we get to sit around our fires and eat our lunch, and then explore the woods a bit, and play on our rope bridges. After lunch we put our fires out, and leave no trace of the fires so it doesn’t even look like we’ve been there, then other people can come and enjoy the woods too.

We play some more games after lunch, and then for our final activity we can choose if we want to build dens or make a clay creature to take home. I make a butterfly because we saw lots of butterflies in the morning sunshine, and they are my favourite animal.

 

Then it’s time to go home, and we collect all our bags, and the things we have made and set off back down the track to meet our families, chatting to our new friends on the way. We are a bit muddy, tired and happy – true Wild Things!

If you are looking to Get Wild – join one or more of our Wild Things Woodland Days this summer or during October Half Term. Dates are:

July – 26th, 27th, 28th
August – 30th & 31st
September – 1st
October – 23rd & 24th

Please see our website for full details or click here to book online now!

www.circleofliferediscovery.com | info@circleofliferediscovery.com | 01273 814226

 

Why overnight camps and residentials are so important!

More and more research is coming to light to support what we in the environmental world have always asserted – being outdoors is good for you!

In an educational context, this means not only are children able to be more active by being outside, they are also able to learn more freely, engage more readily and be inspired, encouraged, challenged and therefore improve their confidence and self-esteem. These positive effects are amplified even more when it comes to an overnight camp or residential.


“I slept alone in a shelter that I had made, I never thought I would be able to do that. I feel more confident and have overcome my fears.”
CLR Camp Participant, June 2015.

Learning Away

Learning Away is an initiative, funded by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, to research the benefits of residential experiences in schools. In 2015 they published a report, (following 3 years of action research with over 60 schools and colleges) identifying the overall impacts of residentials for young people.

The evidence collected throughout the 3-year project showed that residentials:

  • Foster deeper relationships
  • Improve students’ resilience, self-confidence and wellbeing
  • Boost cohesion and a sense of belonging
  • Improve students’ engagement with learning
  • Improve students’ knowledge, skills and understanding
  • Support students’ achievement
  • Smooth students’ transition experiences
  • Provide opportunities for student leadership, co-design and facilitation

“Learning Away has shown that a residential learning experience provides opportunities and benefits/impacts that cannot be achieved in any other educational context or setting. The impact is greater when residential’s are fully integrated with a school’s curriculum and ethos”   York Consulting (2015)

Read the full report here.

Work on the Wild Side

In addition to the Learning Away research, a new report (May 2017), has been released that demonstrates leading schools (highest Progress 8 scores) place high value on residential experiences.

The ‘Work on the Wild Side’ report produced in partnership with Learning Away Consortium members, CLOtCIOL and AHOEC analyses the UK primary and secondary schools with the highest Progress 8 scores and winners of the Pupil Premium Awards.

The report found that “outdoor learning is valued amongst teachers, pupils, parents and inspectors and that the skills learnt outdoors are transferable to the classroom and across the academic spectrum.” Work on the Wild Side, May 2017

It recommends that given the clear benefits of outdoor learning, more needs to be done to ensure that children and young people are provided with the opportunity to leave the classroom.

Read report in full here.

Circle of Life Rediscovery Camps

Circle of Life Rediscovery runs unique, nature-based camps for young people in a beautiful woodland environment in Sussex. Camps have a strong environmental basis and could include activities such as fire-making, tool use, cooking and foraging, team-building activities, art, story-telling, music and night walks. We also offer the John Muir Award, a National Conservation Award, at Discovery level.

“I didn’t think that I liked camping but I have underestimated myself. The camp was amazing, I have not only learnt new skills but I have learnt to be grateful about everything around me. I have a new sense of confidence and believe in myself”
CLR Camp Participant, June 2016.


To find out more about CLR camps, watch one of our films where participants explain what they enjoyed about the camp:

Secondary School camp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cT9qpu7PI0A

Primary School camp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtKK78RuL2Q

 

Please contact us on 01273 814226 or email Katie@circleofliferediscovery.com for more information if you are interested in organising a camp for your school. Each camp is bespoke and unique to your requirements.

There are Free resources on the Learning Away website, include planning tools, models for lower cost trips and curriculum integration.

www.circleofliferediscovery.com

Tel: 01273 814226

Outdoor Learning – A Win Win Situation

Most of us know that spending hours and hours in front of screens, bombarded by emails and message notifications causes us stress.  Humans are not surprisingly more stressed that we have ever been.  It’s subtle and eats away at our well-being.  Our world with all it’s current technological achievements has at the same time adopted dopamine-filled technology to hook us in to screen life.

IMG_4084It’s necessary to know and articulate what we are trying to achieve as educators.  In business the mission statement drives the business and it’s value’s forward.  Many of us educators have a good sense of what represents and motivates us to educate, and what is ‘good education’ but this is not always represented in the requirements at school/government level.

So we do the best we can.

Neuroscience is moving so fast, that what we now understand so much more about the brain, the hormones and how we learn.  Current research corroborates the importance of both play and the outdoors as vital for a child’s development and well-being.  A by product of this is that they also learn much better when they ‘play’ and indeed are outdoors using their bodies and in the midst of the greater living world.

This is true for adults as much as young people.  There are hundreds of top business leaders who are immersing themselves in nature for restoration of their stressful lives.   The outdoors represents to me ‘free medicine’, as well as every living thing that provides life for humans – which is clearly no small thing.

trackingim1My expertise is in working with people outdoors – and for 30 years more specifically working with young people of all ages and backgrounds outdoors.  I have an interest in what motivates people to care about the natural world, to have a greater sense of nature connectedness and to live healthy and satisfying lives.  Bringing nature into our everyday life is a really good idea! We know that our cortisol levels (the stress hormone) reduces once we stay more than 15 minutes in a green space.   This also means that we step out of our predisposition to fight, freeze and flight and into higher order thinking, where we can start to be creative, think out of the box, communicate more easily with others, get in touch with how we really feel, all the while building our knowledge and understanding  through experience with nature.

Within the field of education  there are many theoretical positions that underpin our approaches to education in the UK.   We continue to draw on centuries of theories of learning that include the  authorities like Piaget, Vygotsky, Montessori, Steiner, Guy Claxton, Howard Gardner, to name a few. Essentially these experts value exploration and repetition as a way to learn, see the medium of the outdoors as valuable because it is so diverse and provides multiple sensory experience, and theorists acknowledge the importance of the role of the ‘teacher’ or ‘practitioner’ and how effective they are at communicating.  As brain science develops we understand that we loose what we don’t use, so it’s vital we are exposed to multisensory experiences so that healthy wiring can happen from day 1. Brains are wired,  strengthened and ‘grown’ by multiple experiences that include movement as a basic requirement as well as the critical role of care-giving to provide secure attachment for well-being.

20150407_141132Fortunately we have a win-win situation with ‘outdoor learning’.  The content of what we teach in schools can be delivered outdoors – so we teach all the subjects in nature.  This content is still decided by the teacher and the curriculum but it is taught in the outdoors.

A very large project, Natural Connections (2012 – 2016) was concluded this year.  After 4 years of working with 125 schools (primary, secondary, and special) in the South West of England – 40,000 pupils, 2,500 teachers and 2,500 teaching assistants they discovered that indeed outdoor learning has multiple benefits across any school. The Final Report of this project can be found here.

The evidence shows that giving children the opportunity to discover, learn about and experience the natural world is hugely important – it can help create a sense of belonging rooted in their local environment, enhancing their health, well-being and educational outcomes.  For example, greater amounts of natural space in or around living or learning environments is associated with higher levels of physical activity, better emotional, behavioural and cognitive outcomes and with children developing a greater sense of connectedness to nature.”

We need to also consider that in the UK (and worldwide) we have a huge rise in childhood obesity, mental health issues and a lack of a sense of community.  We are in need of a  vision for of a future where  where we don’t harm nature.  According to the Monitor of Engagement with Natural Environment Survey, in an average month in 2013 – 14 only 8% of all children in England (aged 5 – 16) visited natural environments with their schools.  During home time, exploring and playing outdoors has decreased by 90% over the past 20 years.  Fundamentally children (and adults) can’t protect what they don’t know and love.

DSC01155 - CopyInitiatives like Outside Classroom Day on 18th May helps us to remember to get outdoors. If you are a teacher why not join our Outdoor Learning Day?  These days help us recognise the value of getting outdoors. There are lots of official promotional materials to make it easy to get outside.  Tim Gill, an expert on the benefits of risk and play for children has produced a useful guide which you can find here.

Another useful guide is Michael Follett’s practical guide to help support playtime learning outdoors:

Learning with Nature

Learning with Nature

Finally, our very own book ‘Learning with Nature‘ is filled with nature-based ideas that connect young people of all ages, and their families to nature – it is the ‘Bible for Forest School practitioners’.

Our team at Circle of Life Rediscovery provide diverse nature experiences  for young people, schools and the wider world.  We offer trainings to develop these areas within your setting and offer year-round CPD’s for teachers linking the outdoors with the curriculum.

Have fun outdoors,

Marina.

Marina Robb, Director and Founder of Circle of Life Rediscovery

www.circleofliferediscovery.com | 01273 814226 | info@circleofliferediscovery.com

The Woodland Project wins grant from The Peoples Projects!

Hope for the future – The Woodland Project wins grant from The Peoples Projects!

The Woodland Project in East Sussex offers days out in the woodlands for children and young people with physical and learning disabilities, their families and siblings.

woodlandp (3) - Copy

The project was one of five projects in the Meridian East region shortlisted by The Peoples Projects to be in the running to win a grant of up to £50,000 and it was announced on Thursday 6th April that The Woodland Project had been successful in winning the funds!

Marina Robb, Director of Circle of Life Rediscovery said “We are overjoyed to have been successful in winning this future-changing grant of £49,934, and we would like to thank everyone who voted for us and believed in the value of the work we are doing here, to help support these young people and families.

woodlandp (2)Our aim at Circle of Life Rediscovery is to help families to get outside; to get them involved and learning new skills in the woodlands. And with this incredible opportunity The Peoples Projects has given us, we want to invite others to become involved and continue to support The Woodland Project. The project is funded solely through donations and external funding so even with this amazing grant we have received, the need for support doesn’t stop. You could show your support by volunteering, fundraising or giving a donation – any support is welcomed and would help us to create a sustainable future for The Woodland Project.”

The Peoples Projects is a partnership between the National Lottery, Big Lottery Fund and ITV. To read more about Circle of Life Rediscovery, The Woodland Project, or to find out how you can support go their website or email info@circleofliferediscovery.com.

Thank you to everyone who has supported us and voted!

Jon Cree – Mill Woods, A Place for Play and Deep Learning

Late winter 2017 around the time of imbolc, as we emerged into the lengthening days, I was privileged to facilitate two training days on Story and Play Structures in East Sussex under the loving care of Mill Woods and their weekly citizens – “Circle of Life Rediscovery”.

blogMy initial reticence of working with fairly large groups soon evaporated into the soil, with the rain, when I got to the site (I know that sounds a contradiction but illustrates well the circles in time we all experience through the seasons). I was greeted by the smiles and warmth of Marina, Mark, the fire and luxurious composting loo…oh and the clay, chestnuts, oaks, spruces, pines, willows, birches, great tits, green woodpeckers to name a few other citizens – of course.

This atmosphere made for opportunities to explore the magic and meaning in story and story-making as well as a purposeful place for trying out our hand-tool skills and engage the body in playful exploits that resulted in ladder climbing, rope swinging, strap line wobbling and the makings of a tree-house!

Storying

story3I never tire of witnessing people digging into their imaginative domains and creating from this many wordplay narratives around natural world discoveries that then move on to story.   Armed with the elements of tension, hero journeys, tragedies, helpers and victories story is realised.  The power of the imagination is truly infinite and seeing educators realise their potential to story a place and their own lives always enriches.  By giving permission to play with words, lie and offer some simple frameworks, our own storyteller can be realised…..but the thing, for me, that really provides stimulation is a safe place for experimentation and ‘play’, free of judgment, IS the natural world, and if a fire is present then all the better.  On that damp day in January our spirits were lifted by giants conjuring up rabbits and elfish boats and deep stirrings in the labyrinthine earth bound passages for the dark side to preside in….for moments we were spellbound then lifted by lighthearted fantastical creations!

Play Structures

20170227_100307A month later I approached the Play Structures day with an “irish being”, full of the Irish passion and  blarney…giving me confidence to try the truckers hitch song to start the session – check it out on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUHgGK-tImY.

Once again that playful permission gave me confidence to try something new and although the song didn’t quite work out how I wanted….it seemed to provide permission for folks to play.   With saws, axes, knives and ropes we made A frame ladders that turned into climbing frames…..all in a safe but experimental way (don’t worry all the tool procedures were in place and no limbs were lost!).

blog2We made rope swings and bounced on rope courses thanks to the tensioning truckers knot, and learned the rudimentaries of tree house construction minimising any harm to the tree through the use of tree clamps.  Finishing the day by testing one of our many senses – that sense of balance that is always enhanced by the willingness to play.

If training isn’t about ‘playing’, mentally and physically, with ideas and constructs then I don’t know what it is about!

 

 

By Jon Cree, Acting Treasurer, National and International Representation, The Forest School Association http://www.forestschoolassociation.org/ 

Find out about future CPD courses and similar training with Circle of Life Rediscovery by visiting their website.

www.circleofliferediscovery.com | info@circleofliferediscovery | 01273 814226

The language of the birds

A way to live life more fully. 

16031613356_90c9128db9_mDo you feel fully alive and awake to all the joy and beauty that surrounds you every day?

Do you wake up and say “wow” what a gift to have another day here upon this beautiful earth? Do you feel the full life of all the beings around you?

Do you understand your place in that?

Do you see that life in the children?

How would it feel to live this way every day…?

What if there was a way to help expand our senses to levels of awareness in the world that allow for deep understanding, empathy, creativity and full connection.

Well… there is 

It’s happening all around us all the time and is a part of the symbiotic relationship humans have had since the beginning of time with the natural world that we are a part of.

greenfinch-818185_960_720The Birds offer us a great gift to be able to lift us out of our minds and thoughts and place us deeply into the senses, the place of real understanding and connectivity.

Through the birds we can tap into the flow of the landscape and the beings that are moving across it. Our place. We can start to access a four dimensional picture, using all the senses, of the place that we inhabit and the flow of life that is there. Being fully alive and in the moment of now.

Why is this important? 

If the life of a human being is to experience as fully as possible the gift and joy of being truly alive in ourselves and learn the great wisdom of other forms of life then surely we need to switch on and pay attention.

Imagine a world where the next generation of children are fully awake and delighting in and learning from the experience of life itself. That they are connected deeply to themselves, others and the natural world.

Is that a world worth building? 

naturecommunication (1)
They would be caretakers of this earth, holding it gently for their own children to come.

Come to our CPD day, ‘The Language of the Birds‘, on 4th May and learn about and experience one of the most powerful core routines to help create deep nature connection in yourself and be able to pass this ancestral gift to our children.

 

 

What will we do? 

During this one day CPD we will look at

  • Switching on the senses to as deep a level as possible and explore processes to keep them on.
  • We will, through theory backed up with direct experience, start to pick out the voices of the birds and what they can tell us.
  • We will start to feel the flow of how the land is when all is peaceful and how different it is when a predator is moving across that landscape.
  • We will identify the birds that offer the most learning possibilities and why.
  • We will understand how birds move, why and what this means.
  • We will explore the interconnectedness of all life and how that can enrich our everyday lives.
  • We will understand how bird language can keep us safe.
  • We will also throughout the day show ways to pass this on to people you work with, be that children or adults.
  • This day will be a full mix of didactic information which is then fully experienced in its real form through practical exercises.

Come and join us for this magical day and switch on to the beauty of life. Please see our website for details, or to book online, click here.

This CPD day will be run by Alex Travers.

www.circleofliferediscovery.com

Tel: 01273 814226