Valentine’s Day in the Woods

A Parent’s View – We loved it!

A friend had recommended the Circle of Life Rediscovery Family Wild Day Out to me but I didn’t think it would be ‘our thing’.

Whilst wondering what I was going to do over a rainy half term week and how to keep two energetic girls entertained, I thought – why not?

Can't wait to go back at Easter for another Family Wild Day Out!

 

We set off on a grey morning with our water proofs and packed lunch. We met a few other families at the gate and the children soon started to make friends.

 

Jennie, running the Family Wild Day Out, from Circle of Life Rediscovery was there to greet us and gave the children an activity to do whilst we waited for everyone to arrive.

And Relax…..

One thing I noticed when we got to the woodland site, was the smiles on everyone’s faces.  It was like we had left our stresses behind. I also felt the same, I cannot remember when I had a whole day without looking at my phone every 10 minutes or worrying about what jobs needed to be done. We just focused on each other in the here and now.

Making dens and shelters on our family wild day out!
Sticks and Stones….

After our introductions and safety notes (mainly about the fire and our borders) we set off to make dens! I didn’t think the girls would be that keen, but they couldn’t wait!

Off they ran to collect sticks and leaves, they teamed up with some other children and actually made a fantastic den that we could hide in!

 

LOVE-ly Activities

We made our own bird feeders!Shortly after that we sat together and made heart shaped bird feeders which the girls loved.

I noticed that the older children helped the younger children without being prompted – being together in the woods made everyone join together as one big family.

We were able to take them home and have since enjoyed watching the birds whilst eating our breakfast.

 

Slack lining and rope bridges! Fun at our family wild day out!
Testing our Skills!

After lunch we build rope bridges and tried out our slack lining skills – adults too!

We played games in the woods and Jenny pointed out small bluebell buds starting to grow (must come back to see the woods covered in bluebells in the spring!).

 

 

Relight your Fire!

Making our own fires and experiencing woodland cooking!

It was then time to build our own fire, we split into groups, collected sticks and made our fire which was really satisfying!

The children took it in turns to cook pancakes over the fire which were delicious – it was great for them to try out new skills and they were really pleased with themselves.

 

 

Yummy pancakes on the fire!The leader Jenny and her volunteer Peter, were so patient and good with the kids. They spent time with them explaining what we were doing and why – about the importance of nature and the earth.

I was able to take a step back and breathe in the woodland. I don’t think I have ever stood still in a woodland before, just listening to the bird song, it was actually quite magical. As a busy working mum I have never really taken the time to appreciate it.

 

Such a fun family day!Saying Goodbye

We finished the day by sitting in a circle around the fire and had marshmallows and hot chocolate to warm up.

We said our good byes and headed back to the car, I noticed the girls were covered in mud and had scruffy hair, but they were still smiling.

Having mentioned earlier that I didn’t think the Family Wild Day Out would be up our street – I was so wrong, we can’t wait to go back again for some more family time in the woods.

Family Wild Day Out  – Future Dates

Can't wait to go back again at Easter for another family wild day out!

The next dates for the Circle of Life Rediscovery Family Day Wild Day Out are as follows:

3rd April 2018
31st May 2018
8th August 2018
30th August 2018

Please book online in advance! Details can be found on the website or you can book online here.

 

Circle of Life Rediscovery
Circle of Life Rediscovery offers CPD’s and forest school training for adults, residential camps, forest school, woodland days and enrichment days for schools, plus family days in the woods! For more details please see the website.

 

Forest School Training in East Sussex.

Marina Robb becomes a Forest School Association Endorsed Trainer!

Marina Robb - Endorsed Forest School Association Trainer!In January 2018, the Forest School Association (FSA) – the UK’s professional body and voice for all things Forest School – launched a new quality assurance scheme for Forest School Trainers. The FSA Trainer’s Quality Assurance Scheme is based on a new set of ‘Forest School community’ agreed professional standards.  Marina Robb from Circle of Life Rediscovery has been a successful applicant and has been added to a publicly accessible map on the FSA’s website.

This is an important development for individuals, schools and settings that are trying to identify a trainer to help them or their staff become Forest School qualified. Decision makers such as Local Authorities and Academies can have confidence that an FSA endorsed trainer is operating professionally and works to ‘Forest School community’
agreed professional standards.

The FSA Trainers Quality Assurance Scheme offers the reassurance that Trainers:

• Are working in accordance with good Forest School practice.
• Give adequate face-to-face time to develop a student’s practical
skills.
• Lead courses with the Forest School ethos in mind.
• Provide students with a thorough support package.
• Have the relevant qualifications, first aid training and insurance in
place.
• Model excellent practice themselves.

FSA Registered and Endorsed Forest School TrainerGareth Wyn Davies (CEO of the Forest School Association) says, “FSA endorsement of Forest School Trainers helps the public and decision makers to quickly identify those Trainers who are following good Forest School practice. It allows good training providers to distinguish themselves from other providers who may be offering many less hours of face-to-face tuition, less rigorous assessment and less ongoing support. We therefore congratulate Marina Robb on her success in becoming an FSA Endorsed Forest School Trainer.”

Why choose Forest School Leadership Training with Circle of Life Rediscovery?

Forest School Training in East SussexAre you considering doing your Forest School training? Have you heard about Forest School Training but are not sure about taking the next step?

Here’s all you need to know about our Forest School Training! We asked our past cohort of Forest School Leader trainees about their experience of the training with Circle of Life Rediscovery, and what advice they would give to someone considering taking the next step and becoming a Forest School Leader.

Here are their responses…

(Initials have been used to protect identity, in brackets is the age group each trainee currently works with)

1. What made you want to do Forest School Training?

Forest School Training with Circle of Life RediscoveryB (Primary) – “I have always been interested in nature and have loved spending time outdoors since I was a child. Then having my own children, I was always looking for ways of getting them outside and interacting with the environment. After a big life change a couple of years ago I was looking for something to do alongside my classroom teaching and approached my head about doing the course.”

D (Secondary) – “A colleague had started Forest School training and said how great it was, I have always been in to outdoor learning etc, so had a look online and persuaded our school to start a Forest School.”

Y (Primary, Nursery and Secondary) – “I have always had a passion for the outdoors and have been delivering the Duke of Edinburgh, bush craft and outdoor team building activities for several years. It made sense to get a qualification in the area I enjoyed teaching in and one in which I am passionate about and has an impact on young people almost instantly.”

P (Freelance – Primary, Secondary, SEN) – “I have always had a strong interest in the natural world and as I work predominantly with young people it seemed the perfect way to enhance their appreciation of the world around them and gain a formal qualification.”

2. Why did you choose Circle of Life Rediscovery?

Forest School Training in East SussexB – “I was recommended it by someone who had already done the course. I liked the fact that it gave more than just the ‘facts’.”

R – “Friends had recommended it and it was local to me.”

D – “After looking into lots of different companies Circle of Life Rediscovery seemed to be the best fit with how the course was run.”

P – “Having worked with some of the Circle of Life Rediscovery instructors in the past I have always been impressed by their knowledge and ethos.”

3. Did the training live up to your expectations?

R – “Yes the training more than met my expectations. I felt that the syllabus was broken down well into: practical sessions, theory as part of the group and self study. The group were very good at documenting and sharing images etc, which made it easier when writing up.”

D – “The training really did, I learnt so much from the guys at Circle of Life Rediscovery and felt inspired to learn more and more, I spend most of my free time learning and practising skills now!”

P – “Yes very much so, it really opened up some new areas of interest for me. Coming from a Bush craft background it was great to expand on the elements of play, mindfulness and participant led discovery.”

4. How has your practice changed since the training?

R – “My organisation skills have improved. I feel more confident to observe and react to learning before interjecting. I feel more capable when demonstrating practical skills.”

D – “Before I started training I was in a classroom everyday, I rarely go into the school now. I work in our outside area all day everyday.”

Y – “More organised and not trying to cram too much into the sessions and allow it to be more child led.”

Forest School Training Level 3 with Circle of Life Rediscovery

 

5. What was the best thing about the training?

B – “Being around like minded people, the amazing settings for the training, the knowledge and support of the leaders.”

R – “I enjoyed the games and practical training. It was really useful to spend time being a student outdoors before being a leader with students! The day when Ringmer school came to the woods was probably the best as it was a consolidation of all the ideas and theory. I had a genuine sense that this was something I could do by the end of that day.”

D – “Learning so many new skills, like knots and whittling, plus a very friendly learning environment with a great group of people.”

Y – “I enjoyed all elements of the course including the course work as it helped identify I need to have a better knowledge of trees plants etc.”

6. What would your advice be for someone thinking about doing Forest School training?

B – “Definitely do it!”

R – “Try as many activities as possible as they will only scratch the surface of the possibilities when you begin responding to students. Make sure you document the sessions with photos and film as you will need them when it comes to writing up! Take a camera on walks to broaden your identification skills.”

D – “Go for it! Not much else I can say, if you enjoy working in a woodland environment and in the outdoors this is definitely training you should do!”

Y – “To give yourself the time to really concentrate on the course with as little distraction as possible. To complete parts of the course work as you go. Maybe some pre-course reading or identification of trees plants etc.”

P – “I would recommend it especially to those who already have an active interest in outdoor learning as well as to the complete novice. Leave your assumptions behind and soak everything up, you will learn more than you might expect, some of it about yourself.”

7. Do you have any other comments?

Join our unique Forest School Training Level 3!
B – “Would appreciate lots of CPD opportunities next year please!”

D – “I thoroughly enjoyed Forest School training with Circle of Life Rediscovery and the training really has had a massive impact on my life! I actually enjoy getting up to go into work!”

P – “Having done Forest School training in the past I was particularly impressed by the breadth and depth that Circle of Life Rediscovery practitioners bought to the whole experience. “


For more information on Forest School Training in East Sussex with Circle of Life Rediscovery see our website HERE. Please click here to read our FAQ’s.

We are running our next course in September 2019.

Circle of Life Rediscovery

www.circleofliferediscovery.com

01273 814226

info@circleofliferediscovery.com

 

Make it ‘Outdoor Classroom Day’ every day!

Ideas to inspire your Outdoor Learning. Make it Outdoor Classroom Day every day!

Outdoor Classroom Day took place this year on 12th October 2017 with 19,800 schools getting involved and spending the day (or part of the day) learning outside the classroom with their pupils. This is an amazing collaborative effort, not just in the UK but across the World, with 2.3 million children across 105 countries taking part, quite an achievement for an initiative that started off just in London in 2012, as Empty Classroom Day.

…but shouldn’t this sort of outdoor learning be taking place every day, in every school across the world, even in the Autumn term?!

To help inspire you to get your class outside this Autumn and at Outdoor Classroom Day, we have collected some simple ideas to use the natural resources around you for outdoor learning.

Waxed Autumn Leaves

Make it Outdoor Classroom Day every day!

Taken from  ‘Learning with Nature’, by Marina Robb (Director of Circle of Life Rediscovery), Victoria Mew and Anna Richardson.

Discover outdoor learning with Learning with Nature

How to:
Waxed Autumn Leaves, ideas for outdoor learning this Autumn and Winter!

  • Gather many varieties of Autumn leaves, press and dry them in books or a flower press. The leaves take a few days to dry. Either prepare this part in advance, or see the gathering of the leaves as a separate activity.
  • Light a fire. Melt beeswax in a pan over the fire.
  • Take the pan off the fire and dip the leaves. To do so safely, hold the leaf stem and dip. Avoid immersing the fingers!
  • Take the leaf out of the wax, hold above the pan and immediately shake downwards to remove extra wax before it dries. Avoid shaking side to side as droplets of wax can go over clothing.
  • Blow the leaves gently to complete the drying.
  • The wax coating will help to preserve the leaves. They can be used for all sorts of crafts, and are especially lovely when threaded.

Create your own Environmental Art projects

Environmental Art

How to:

  • Collect fallen leaves of different colours and shapes
  • Be as creative as you like – create raindows, sunbursts, collages of animals, abstract art
  • Take inspiration from environmental artists like Andrew Goldsworthy or Nils-Udo

Twig Towers

Twig Towers for Outdoor Classroom DayHow to:

  • Collect a big pile of sticks
  • Divide your class in to groups
  • Set them the challenge – who can build the highest twig tower?
  • How can you measure which one is the tallest?
  • How many sticks did each tower use?
  • How could you use fewer sticks and still make the tallest tower?

 

For more ideas and inspiration did you know Circle of Life Rediscovery can come to your school to run bespoke Inset training in your school grounds, or you can bring your staff to our beautiful Sussex woodland site.

Contact us here for more details or call 01273 814226.

We also run CPD courses throughout the year on a number of different topics, please see our website for details.

Happy Outdoor Learning!
Katie Scanlan, Operations Manager, Circle of Life Rediscovery CIC.

The language of the birds

A way to live life more fully. 

16031613356_90c9128db9_mDo you feel fully alive and awake to all the joy and beauty that surrounds you every day?

Do you wake up and say “wow” what a gift to have another day here upon this beautiful earth? Do you feel the full life of all the beings around you?

Do you understand your place in that?

Do you see that life in the children?

How would it feel to live this way every day…?

What if there was a way to help expand our senses to levels of awareness in the world that allow for deep understanding, empathy, creativity and full connection.

Well… there is 

It’s happening all around us all the time and is a part of the symbiotic relationship humans have had since the beginning of time with the natural world that we are a part of.

greenfinch-818185_960_720The Birds offer us a great gift to be able to lift us out of our minds and thoughts and place us deeply into the senses, the place of real understanding and connectivity.

Through the birds we can tap into the flow of the landscape and the beings that are moving across it. Our place. We can start to access a four dimensional picture, using all the senses, of the place that we inhabit and the flow of life that is there. Being fully alive and in the moment of now.

Why is this important? 

If the life of a human being is to experience as fully as possible the gift and joy of being truly alive in ourselves and learn the great wisdom of other forms of life then surely we need to switch on and pay attention.

Imagine a world where the next generation of children are fully awake and delighting in and learning from the experience of life itself. That they are connected deeply to themselves, others and the natural world.

Is that a world worth building? 

naturecommunication (1)
They would be caretakers of this earth, holding it gently for their own children to come.

Come to our CPD day, ‘The Language of the Birds‘, on 4th May and learn about and experience one of the most powerful core routines to help create deep nature connection in yourself and be able to pass this ancestral gift to our children.

 

 

What will we do? 

During this one day CPD we will look at

  • Switching on the senses to as deep a level as possible and explore processes to keep them on.
  • We will, through theory backed up with direct experience, start to pick out the voices of the birds and what they can tell us.
  • We will start to feel the flow of how the land is when all is peaceful and how different it is when a predator is moving across that landscape.
  • We will identify the birds that offer the most learning possibilities and why.
  • We will understand how birds move, why and what this means.
  • We will explore the interconnectedness of all life and how that can enrich our everyday lives.
  • We will understand how bird language can keep us safe.
  • We will also throughout the day show ways to pass this on to people you work with, be that children or adults.
  • This day will be a full mix of didactic information which is then fully experienced in its real form through practical exercises.

Come and join us for this magical day and switch on to the beauty of life. Please see our website for details, or to book online, click here.

This CPD day will be run by Alex Travers.

www.circleofliferediscovery.com

Tel: 01273 814226

 

Forest School Training in Ireland!

Circle of Life Training in association with Circle of Life Rediscovery CIC offers a Level 3 Forest School Programme Leadership. We are delighted to be working in partnership with Earth Force Education to bring our ground breaking Forest School Leadership training to Ireland.

Who is the training designed for?

This Level 3 Training is designed for professionals already working with young people who wish to establish and deliver a Forest School/Environmental Education programme. It is appropriate for those over the age of 21 years with relevant qualifications including teachers, youth workers, playworkers, rangers, ecologists or teaching assistants with experience of working with young people  (at least 2 years).

What do people think about our training? See below for feedback and how to get involved!

What have you enjoyed most about this training?

Forest School Training Ireland
“How all the participants were bought together through activities, games and music and how I have noticed nature at a different level.”

“I have loved the games, songs, new ideas and learning from new people.”

“There was an excellent combination of outdoor and classroom lessons.”

 

“It was great having 3 leaders all with different experience and ideas to share.”

“Passion for the outdoors is infectious!”

Forest School Training Ireland

“The course was delivered in such a lovely way, I would love to be a child in your forest school! I have learnt more about nature and to be free of the ties and expectations of everyday life.”

“I have learnt so many practical skills as well as how to do a risk assessment!”

“I loved everything about this training, from the skills learned, enthusiasm of the trainers and have learnt so much about nature. Thank you for an amazing 5 days with a lovely team.”

“I loved using the tools, I was nervous at first but was made to feel at ease straight away.”

Forest School Training Ireland

“I enjoyed the sit spots and quite moments. The knife work was fun and challenging. You made me feel very safe and included.”

“I loved the welcoming atmosphere, the wealth of knowledge and the hands on activities.”

“I loved making crafts from natural materials found in the woods.”

How has the training personally impacted you?

“The passion of the course leaders has really inspired me.”

“The inspiring leaders have had a positive impact on me and how I work.”

Forest School Training Ireland

“I feel invigorated! I have now started to think about my own practices and bring my ideas to life.”

“I have met so many enthusiastic people on the training, I am now excited for what I can do in the future.”

“It has made me realise the importance of child led activities and has made me want to become a forest school leader.”

” I loved being in the fresh air and have felt healthier all round.”

“I had time to reflect, which I found very moving.”

Forest School Training Ireland

“The child led approach has been fascinating, I learnt to give everything a go.”

“It has been an inspiring and emotional experience (in a good way!)”

“I feel my stress levels have been reduced and you have made me re-evaluate my life. Plus, I have laughed so much! This has been the best week of my life.”

Forest School Training Ireland

 

“You have brought me out of myself and have reminded me what is important.”

This training is booked through our partner provider Earth Force Education further information can be found here.

Please contact Ciara Hinksman or call 086 3199 515 for more information about this training in Ireland.


Forest School Training in the UK

If you are looking for a course in the UK, Circle of Life Rediscovery offers a Level 3 course, commencing March 2017! Full details can be found here. The training dates are:

Part one: March 6th – 9th 2017
Part two: April 24th – 26th 2017
Part three: May 15th – 16th 2017

The training will combine key principles of Forest School with best practice from Environment and Nature Education, child development, the world of play (wild, free and therapeutic play) delivered by our professional team who have many years experience.

Please call 01273 814226 or send an email for more information.

The Web of Life

I remember many years ago reading ‘Trees are actually alive”. For me it led to a shift in awareness. I knew that trees are biologically alive, but this felt different. I still feel wonder and awe knowing that some trees suck up hundreds of gallons of water per day, transforming sunlight into sugars, and that they can regrow limbs! I couldn’t imagine a world without trees.

IMG_5398[1]

 

It is incredible that trees are hooked up by their roots to other trees through a network of mycelium! This cooperative web of plants and trees support the fungi with food and in exchange, the fungi provide nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen. The trees, soil and sun are all interacting with each other.

 

The older, ‘hub’ trees, the elders of our land connect to hundreds of other trees. Working together the whole system is resilient.

Trees are alive

I don’t understand why we often dismiss how much the non-human world is alive. Our ancestral traditions are often written off as ‘primitive’ or ‘spiritual’ yet these people deeply felt the intrinsic ‘aliveness’ of the plant and animal kingdoms – from the trees to the stones.

autumn1

 

Long-standing earth-based cultures have this awareness and understanding and are experts in their fields. They are the great botanists, ecologists, zoologists, woodland/land managers.  It is only a matter of time before we have the scientific language that effectively describes this aliveness. Like us, the trees need air, water, earth and sun; they have particular characters, communication and intelligence and provide medicines. Birch trees for example have a bark that peels. It has particular medicine for psoriasis.

 

It is important to me that the experience of life and the natural world is not only understood in instrumental and mechanical ways. There are as many ways of knowing as there are trees! I love the smell of the forest, the colours of all the leaves, the shapes and textures, the peace, the creative thoughts that occur, the many sounds that are home to so many other creatures.

Access barriers

The big barrier is and always has been access to land. The new Tree Charter which is borne out of the Charter of the Forest from the 13th Century is a stark reminder of the importance of access to land.  Whoever owns land has immense power and determines the stewardship of their land.  We are all subject to the authority of whoever owns the land and much of the land continues to be held by big estates and top income earners. They manage their situation for a particular end and this always includes biological diversity. Though it must be said, they too have been guardians of our heritage and increasingly landowners are interesting in supporting ‘rewilding’. Thankfully we do have our public right of way. I support community woodlands, and am part of one in Sussex. It is a modern way of communities accessing land, (see Plunkett Foundation).

The present day situation

autumn3

 

We are more acutely aware than ever, that the things that benefit the people are inextricably linked to the things that benefit the non-human world. We are currently living in a vastly diminished natural environment compared even to a few hundred years ago – but we don’t feel this because we live relatively in the present, concerning ourselves with our present needs, favouring our own children, and not the future generations. Our brains scan and remember what we experience, so as our access to nature is reduced, so too is our awareness that nature exists – it is a form of cultural blindness.

To avoid this ‘blindness’ we have to expose ourselves to the trees and lap up the well-being that comes from this.

I would love to see more children playing outdoors, meeting the non-human world every day, creating brain patterns – the invisible mycelium of reciprocal relationships. I am very grateful for the tree under which I could hide and retreat in my childhood and am now very grateful to the woodlands in which I spend so much time!

Blog by Marina Robb (PGCE; Msc; MA), as part of the #TreeCharter. Marina is the Director of Circle of Life Rediscovery & Author of Learning with Nature.

Circle of Life Rediscovery provides nature based experiences and programmes that are educational, fun and often life-changing! These include funded projects with our partners that directly support health and well-being for vulnerable members of our society, days for schools or family days in the woodlands and bespoke residential camps and Forest Schools. You can gain a qualification in leading your own Forest School programme or improve your knowledge and skills with our adult training CPD days.

autumn2

Have you got a memory of being out and about in the trees and woods as a child? What do you feel are the threats that trees and woods in the UK face? Add your voice to the Charter for Trees, Woods and People.

 

 

https://www.circleofliferediscovery.com/

Tel: 01273 814226

Forest School Training with Circle of Life Rediscovery

Open College Network West Midlands, Level 3 Certificate for Forest School Leaders

Join our forest school training level 3 course in March!

At Circle of Life Rediscovery, our Forest School Training Level 3 course combines key principles of Forest School with best practice from Environment and Nature Education, child development and the world of play including wild, free and therapeutic play.

 


Who are the trainers?

Our training team includes Marina Robb, Mark Lloyd and Anna Richardson who are all qualified Forest School Leaders with backgrounds in teaching, nature connection and woodland management.

Learning with Nature
Together, they have over 40 years’ experience working outdoors and across different ages and backgrounds. Marina and Anna are authors of the popular, Learning with Nature: A how-to guide to inspiring children through games and activities’.


Who is the training for?

Forest School Training with Circle of Life Rediscovery

 

Our trainee’s come from a wide range of backgrounds including teaching, outdoor/nature/bushcraft education, play work, organisations who work with young people, or with challenging and vulnerable backgrounds. Trainee’s need to be over 21 years old and have 2 years’ experience working with young people.

 

 

 

Why do we support this approach?

There is a growing understanding of the importance of play and the outdoors for children’s health and well-being and capacity to learn. We believe play (wild, free play and therapeutic) is essential for emotional well-being and nature provides a multitude of health and learning opportunities. Research into the brain science reinforces how exploration and taking risks in the outdoors and during childhood, grows networks that support us into adulthood.

Furthermore, we believe that providing opportunities for people to experience nature is a pre-requisite for caring for nature.

How much work is there involved in forest school training?

The whole training takes about one year to complete. During that time you will have 9
face to face training days, which include all the practical and planning skills for Forest
School; child development theory, observation and listening to children; the benefits of
the outdoors and play; creating your forest school handbook: policies and risk
assessments; woodland stewardship and management.

Course content and units:

The OCN accreditation training carries a total of 18 credits at Level 3 and consists of 5 units.
Credit Value 18, GLH: 96, TQT: 180
Guided Learning hours (GLH) supervised or direct study time required for a unit.
Total Qualification Time (TQT) number of guided learning hours (GLH) plus the time taken by learner for private study or work experience. See our website to download the units in detail.

Forest School Training in East SussexOur aim is to equip you to provide a safe, fun and professional experience for young
people outdoors that above all keep you and your groups inspired and curious about life, learning and nature!

We offer our forest school training across the seasons to enable you to experience nature and experience what’s possible at different times of year! As members of the Forest School Association UK we follow the Forest School Principles and maintain high standards. In addition to this, if you do not already hold a current Outdoor First Aid certificate you will need to attend a two day outdoor First Aid Training.

Everyone who trains as a Forest School facilitator runs 6 free Forest School sessions as
part of their training. You find and assess woodland/nature space, and plan and deliver
forest school sessions that are based on your observations of the children. You write this
up and it forms part of your assessment.

Learn how to inspire others through woodland activities!What is ‘the pilot’?

Everyone who trains as a Forest School facilitator runs 6 free Forest School sessions as part of their training. You find and assess woodland/nature space, and plan and deliver forest school sessions that are based on your observations of the children. You write this
up and it forms part of your assessment.

 

 

You will need to be covered by insurance to do this – it is highly recommended you carry
out your Pilot sessions within an established organisation or school. It’s a good idea to
think about options in advance, and we can support you to find a suitable placement.
We encourage you to work alongside other learning practitioners, creating peer support
during your ‘Pilot 6 sessions’. Learning by doing, getting as much experience as possible
will increase your confidence.

What can I do once I have the qualification?

Forest School leaders work in schools, colleges, charities, early years, nature-based organisations, social services, play work, and independently. As a qualified facilitator, you will be able to take out groups of young people, families and adults outdoors enabling then to discover the natural world, themselves, increase their learning, confidence and sense of well being.

This forest school training provides a complete foundation to working in nature with groups of children of all ages and capabilities. You will learn to bring in skills you have learned (e.g fire making, shelter building, using ropes & tools, songs & foraging) when appropriate, and trust your own knowledge of the children to provide and support experiences and play opportunities that build from their own interests.

I have paediatric/occupational first aid; do I still need Outdoor First Aid?

Yes, you still need to be Outdoor First Aid trained even if you already have paediatric
training/occupational first aid. The reason is that Forest School is typically held away
from road access therefore emergency services may need to call in other rescue services
to do a stretcher carry which can take more time. Also, outdoor first aid is more specific
to what happens at Forest School.

How do I get a Disclosure Barring Service?

If you are not hold a current DBS, you can arrange this with the school or service you
offer your pilot sessions to, or go through an umbrella organisation. Please leave
enough time to do this.

What do previous participants have to say?

“This was the best training I have ever done, from any given provider!”

“If it benefits me, and my mind and sense of self, imagine what it can do for children. It’s like no training I’ve ever experienced before.”

“The training was excellent. Marina and Mark gave me the confidence to try everything and to be successful at it.”

“It was so diverse and fun, so many games, ideas and activities that I can now deliver myself in the future.”

“A great balance of theory and practical skills. Just truly an amazing experience, I feel confident to now deliver sessions.”

“As well as the training side, this has been a personal journey and helped me to rediscover and reconnect as well as great for my mind and mental health.”

WE LOVE FOREST SCHOOL!

NEXT COURSE COMMENCES MARCH 2018

2018 Training Dates: part one: March 5th – 8th 2018, part two: April 23rd – 25th 2018, part three: May 15th – 16th 2018.

Location: Our forest school training takes place at Picketts Wood, Picketts Lane, Nutley, TN22 3EG and at our stunning site at Mill Woods, near Laughton, read about it here.

To find out about our forest school training course and to book, please see our website or send an email. To chat about the training please call Marina on 01273 814226.

Circle of Life Rediscovery

The Community Sacred Fire & Fire Quest

The Community Sacred Fire

Are you or your child ready to participate in a Fire Quest Rites of Passage? Do you want to come and support the village and Sacred Fire, whilst learning about this ancient ceremony?

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Join our Community Sacred Fire & Fire Quest Weekend

The Community Sacred Fire is a special container which holds space for people to connect on many levels. It is a place to remember departed loved ones, to honour the ancestors, to remember our ancient relationship with the elements, to reconnect with people, to share stories, to laugh, to cry, and to return to inner harmony. It is also a place remember the blessings of life, and to remember to live in service to the future generations.

 

 

The Community Sacred Fire is a multi generational event held at times of need. That need can include times of deep sorrow and times of great joy and celebration. It is a place that allows the safe processing for grief; and it can also be a focal point for a community during Rites of Passage.

In September 2016, we are offering a weekend of Community Sacred Fire teachings for people wanting to learn more. The weekend will be led by Salvatore Gencarelle.

People will be introduced to this powerful container and some of its applications. As part of these teachings we will be exploring our relationship with the natural elements (fire, water, stone, and air) and how to combine these elements into the event. On Saturday September 17th we will hold an overnight Community Sacred Fire for all those attending. The fire will be tended throughout the night allowing a time for people to connect. This Community Sacred Fire is being held in support of people doing a Rite of Passage called a Fire Quest.   We will also participate in an Inipi, more commonly known as a Sweat lodge – all ages welcome.

The Fire Quest

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Taking place in September 2016, Fire Quest Weekend & Sacred Fire for adult, young people and families.

Many people in the modern world so desperately want to live lives full of connection and love. Yet we were never given the opportunity to go through authentic Rites of Passage to support our growth out of childhood. People now find themselves locked into a childlike state of reactions and views.

 

 

 

How can we help ourselves and the next generation of children to become well grounded, completely connected individuals?

Historically, the role of indigenous cultures has been to ensure that each community member develops into a healthy and happy “Human Being”. The ancient cultures hold a deep understanding of the life stages, as well as how to meet the challenges that come with these life stages. They had processes to facilitate the transitions between the stages. Individuals were enabled to unfold and blossom into their own personalities and gifts, with responsibility, aliveness and incredible joy. This knowledge and understanding was necessary in order to prevent people from stagnating in their personal development and getting stuck in loops of adolescent behaviour, something we can often observe in modern societies.

The Fire Quest is a Rite of Passage which was historically used as a means to mark and support the transition from childhood into young adulthood. The quest traditionally occurs during the formative teenage years, approximately between 12-17 years of age. The quest involves a person being honoured by the community, sent out from a Community Sacred Fire into nature to tend a personal fire throughout the night. During the night the quester reflects on their life, their gifts, their wounds, and learns directly from their interaction with the fire and nature. During the night the quester is supported by their family and the people at the Community Sacred Fire. In the morning the quester is welcomed back to the Community Sacred Fire where they share their experiences from the night.

In the modern world any adult undertaking this Quest will gain deep insight into themselves and their relationship with all of life.

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Taking place 16th – 18th September 2016 with Salvatore Gencarelle

 

Please click here to find out about our Community Sacred Fire & Fire Quest Weekend, taking place from 16th – 18th September 2016, for adults, families and young people.

 

 

Date: 16th – 18th September 2016.
Location: Laughton, East Sussex.
Who should attend: Adults, families (including siblings) and young people (aged 12 – 17 years).

 

Learning with Nature – Reflections, Thoughts & Reviews

“This book offers a chance to the youth of today and the nature of tomorrow. It has a wealth of structured, tried and tested projects, ideas and games all designed to allow children to breathe fresh air and engage personally with a real world where their minds and bodies can develop and bloom, burst into life and inspire them to love life.”
Chris Packham, BBC

Learning with Nature, special offer available now!

 

“This wonderful new book aims to connect children with nature. Through a broad range of outdoor activities and games, young people are encouraged to engage their senses and interact with nature. This not only leads to a better understanding of the natural world but can also contribute to much broader agendas such as personal and social development.

 

Most importantly, the activities are fun. It is through enjoyment and understanding that people will want to conserve and care for their environment and so I encourage everyone to give the book a try.”
Andy Naylor, John Muir Award England Manager

“Whether you are a parent or educator, Learning with Nature is full of ideas for fun in the great outdoors. It caters for children and young people of all ages and abilities – and comes with clear instructions and illustrations. So grab a copy, get your boots on, fill your backpack and head to your nearest wild (or not so wild) space for some playful adventures.”
Tim Gill, Author of No Fear: Growing Up In A Risk Averse Society

Learning with Nature, special offer available now!
“Learning with Nature is fittingly described as “A how-to guide to inspiring children through outdoor games and activities”. Featuring a foreword from Chris Packham, the book is packed with dozens of activities and games as well as survival skills and a brief note on looking after nature. The activities, some of which are split by season, are varied and suitable for families of all sizes.

 

We especially enjoyed the Walnut Boats activity and the Swallow Migration activity, which involves children simulating the epic journey swallows make with their own home-made birds.

The games section of the book is perfect for youth groups or schools, as the majority of games require 4 or more children to play and many are suitable for groups of 8 or larger.
Learning with Nature is an excellent resource for youth groups or schools looking for some inspiring ideas for outdoor pursuits. In terms of activities, the book is great for families, though some of the games will require your children’s friends to come along!”
Farming & Countryside Education (FACE)

“Beautifully presented as a ‘how-to’ guide to inspire children, Learning with Nature is aimed at families, schools, youth groups and anyone working with children. The activities are suitable for ages 3 to 16 and will help develop practical skills, awareness and respect for the natural world. An initial flick through reveals great images and a layout of activities that is easy to follow.
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The introduction gives context in the form of an intriguing diagram showing an ‘extinction of experience’ revealed by the decline in roaming radius from home of 8 year olds from the 1920s (6 miles) to 2007 (700 yards), followed by the benefits of increased time in nature.

 

There’s also advice on how to make the most of the book through the art of questioning to nurture curiosity, and a section on Looking after Nature which sets out the interplay between nature and people to allow both to flourish. I was thinking hard before I got to the activities!

The activities are set out in 4 themes: games, naturalist, seasonal and survival skills. There’s a large range and each activity has clear advice on resources needed (often none, which I like), number of people, age, duration and how to do it. A note on variations and links to similar or complimentary activities is helpful. A side box titled Invisible Learning gives an idea of what we might expect when using the activity, advice I found either reinforced my own ideas or alerted me to new possibilities.

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If the book lacks anything it’s the benefits of using the outdoors from a formal education perspective. However I think those working in this context will easily recognise ways of using these activities in their work. This book is much more than a collection of great activities. It has an aim we can all buy into to forge “a heartfelt relationship [with nature] that will renew and inform our culture, creating love and respect for the natural world.”

 

 

This is an excellent book for parents, teachers and youth leaders alike looking to inspire young people with nature. Get a copy and head outdoors!”
Graham Watson, John Muir Award Cumbria Manager

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“I picked this book up thinking that it would be another ‘nice to have but probably not essential’ addition to our Learning through Landscapes library. I glanced briefly at the introduction expecting to be presented with the usual list of academics’ justifications of why learning and playing outside is good, quoting myriad obscure references with long names and concepts that mean little when you are thinking – ‘shall we go outside today to do something?’. I was very pleasantly surprised indeed.

 

The book has clearly been written by people who have their own clear, well developed and straightforward understanding of why challenging, fun and educational activities in the outdoors are not only good, they are essential, enjoyable and inspirational.

Simple concepts presented in beautifully illustrated pages in a very non-patronising style. For example – there are assumptions made that practitioners already know how to make things like bread dough and if they don’t, they can easily look it up – we don’t want to spend money on a book that tells us how to make dough – we want to spend money on a book that takes bread dough outside for an interesting experience. This book does that. I have to confess I went completely off task at one point as I was trying to remember if I had any essential oils hanging around so I could try sniff-tracking with them or if we had any suitably shaped wood for the burning bowls.

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Many of these ideas are new or are presented in a new context which is a refreshing change from reading about 50 things I was doing ten years ago with children. Many of them use risk and adventure as vehicles for effective experiential learning meaning that these activities will appeal to older children as well as the younger ones and indeed many adults.  I can see these activities turning up in LTL training sessions.

Some activities will need to be delivered by people who have experience of the safe handling of tools such as bow-saws and palm drills. Others can be safely delivered by anyone who can be trusted with a spot of clay or some melted candle-wax.

Not all of the activities require resources or tools at all. Some make new games out of old concepts, others do require specific items but these are generally not hard to source. The language of the book is gentle and thoughtful, we are asked to harvest sticks of wood ‘respectfully’, one activity refers to the ‘heartbeat of a cow’. A bug hotel suggests that we make ‘diverse rooms for the insects’ rather like some sort of more boutique or art-house style bug hotel, a cut above your cheaper end motel. The references to invisible learning ensure that no activity fails to hold its own and everything can contribute to effective teaching and learning. The book has a sense of a refined collection to it not a random gathering of ideas. My over-whelming feeling when looking through the ideas is that I really, really want to try some of these. Some of the artistic creations are very beautiful.

And if I am this excited about it then I am sure others will be too. Be nice to yourself – invest in this harvest of ideas, it’s actually really worth it. Isn’t it time you got out more?” Juno Hollyhock, Executive Director, Learning through Landscapes

“By my bed I have a pile of books I dip into every now and then for a bit of inspiration. This book is now top of my pile; a must have resource for outdoor fun. Learning with Nature is full of activities, games to get children outside, keep them motivated and most importantly of all having fun. The book is split up into sections covering games, nature activities, seasonal activities and survival skills. The book is straightforward to navigate and gets the right balance of pictures and text, which can be all too often overlooked in books. This book gets in just right. The information is uncomplicated to follow and easy to digest, with top tips and interesting facts throughout the book.

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The activities are well structured, though some of the activities work best with groups, but can be adapted for the family. I like the extra  information provided on what’s being learnt and provides some inspiration on questions you can ask your child to enhance their learning. We decided to try out a few of the activities.

 

We had a great fun trying out these activities on a woodland walk and enhanced a walk into something much more exciting and educational for the children.”
Shell, Get Out with the Kids

Learning with Nature – special offer available now for Christmas, click here to purchase and find out more!

www.circleofliferediscovery.com

Elders as Culture Keepers

My parents tipi in at the Chipps' countrySafeguarding the Continuation of Life

By Salvatore Gencarelle

How did we become so far removed from the natural state of honouring and respecting elders? How has our modern society become so removed from this natural and innate way of being?

Find out more by clicking on the link to download the full article.

Sal’s next training in the UK is Life Stage Honouring: A practical application of Rites of Passage. 

Read now.