Woodland based Awards on International Day of Forests!

International Day of Forests!
Woodland awards and qualifications for your pupils

On International Day of Forests we wanted to share details of our woodland-based and outdoor awards, enabling your students to gain valuable qualifications!

 

 

 

The John Muir Award – suitable for years 5, 6 and above

Find out more about the John Muir Award and how this can benefit your pupils!
The John Muir Award
is a National Conservation Award and can be achieved at Discovery Level either as series of day visits or 4 consecutive days.

 

The award is suitable for pupils from upper Key stage 2 onwards, and gives students the opportunity to connect with, enjoy and care for a wild place through 4 challenges: Discover, Explore, Conserve and Share.

Residential Woodland Camp Case Study: Tiffins Boys School, London

Bespoke camps for schools

We start the process with a Woodland Day in May to learn the skills students will need for camp (Discover); fire lighting, shelter building and cooking. During the woodland day, we also provide an opportunity for students to join in the planning of camp activities – within reason!

 

The camp then takes place in June for 2 nights and 3 days (Explore) and includes tool use, team building games, night stalks, cooking, a conservation activity (Conserve) and plenty of adventure!

Students then go back to school and Share what they have learnt. They come away from the experience with more confidence, closer as a team, with a better understanding of the natural environment and having achieved the John Muir Award at Discovery level.

“I didn’t think that I liked camping but I have underestimated myself. The camp was amazing, I have not only learnt new skills but I have learnt to be grateful about everything around me. I have a new sense of confidence and believe in myself.”
Camp Participant, June 2017.

Other Woodland Qualifications

Each of the qualifications below requires a minimum commitment of 4 days in an outdoor environment, ideally a woodland, but they can also take in your school grounds, a local park or a woodland across the school year.

OCN Basic Woodland Skills and Knowledge – Suitable for working at Entry Level

3 key principles:

  • Know how to work safely in the outdoors
  • Be able to use tools to make items
  • Be able to recognise woodland life
OCN Woodland Skills and Nature – Suitable for those working at Level 1

5 key principles:

  • Understand health and safety responsibilities when using woodland survival skills
  • Be able to recognise woodland life
  • Know the principles of fire lighting
  • Be able to light a fire
  • Be able to use skills for practical woodland tasks
Case Study: Moulsecoomb Community Forest Garden Project

“The majority of the students we work with have Special Educational Needs (SEN) experiencing difficulties within main stream education for many reasons. A great deal of our in nature work initially is therapeutic.

The OCN Level 1 Woodland Skills qualification gives us the opportunity to give an award that is non invasive in its evidence gathering and doesn’t compromise the therapeutic process.

Its simplicity gives us the space to be able to encourage students to develop skills, underpinning knowledge and natural awareness, creating enthusiasm and interest.

The opportunity to earn and receive a certificate as a record of achievement really does motivate students, becoming an important part of their self development and eventually CVs.

We began awarding the OCN certificates through Circle of Life Rediscovery back in 2011, as a community project many of the students who have received the award and since left school come back to see us, they always mention the OCN level 1 they received.

I would say the Level 1 award represents not just a record of achievement, but also marks a passage in time, a process these young people very much enjoyed.”

Patrick Beach, Outdoor Education Instructor / Therapeutic Practitioner
Moulsecoomb Community Forest Garden Project

Our Woodland Site

Forest School at our Woodland Site

 

Circle of Life Rediscovery welcomes all our groups to a stunning 10 acre of beautiful mixed broad-leafed woodland known as Mill Woods. It is near Laughton Village, located 10 miles from Lewes in East Sussex.

 

We offer a range of opportunities for schoolsorganisations, professional health and social services to access this natural environment though programmes, day events and trainings. Read more about it here.

Circle of Life RediscoveryOur programmes include Forest School Sessions, Enrichment Days and Activity Days for schools across East Sussex. For adults we offer CPD’s, Forest School Training, Forest School First Aid Training and bespoke in-house training for organisations.

 

If you would like to find out more, please visit our website or call 01273 814226.

#InternationalDayofForests!

The John Muir Award: A Case Study

What is the John Muir Award?

The John Muir Award is a national environmental award that encourages people of all
backgrounds to connect with, enjoy and care for wild places through a structured yet
adaptable scheme. The Award isn’t competitive but should challenge each participant. It
encourages awareness and responsibility for the natural environment, in a spirit of fun,
adventure and exploration. The Award is open to all, and is the educational initiative of the John Muir Trust. To find out more, please click here.

What does the Award involve?

The John Muir Award has 4 challenges for students, which are designed to promote a holistic approach to learning, and reflect John Muir’s own wilderness experience.
The Challenges are:

  • Discover a wild place – this could be your school grounds, woodlands, the mountains
  • Explore it – increase your understanding
  • Conserve – take personal responsibility
  • Share your experiences

What are the benefits to schools?

There are several ways you could use the John Muir Award to benefit your pupils, and
encourage learning:

Learn about the John Muir Award and benefits to schools

  • Encourage an experiential approach to teaching curriculum subjects
  • Help close gaps in attainment and opportunity, improve behaviour and attendance and increase engagement with learning
  • Promote physical and emotional wellbeing
  • Utilise school grounds, local or more distant wild places, and make connections between them

To find out more about John Muir Award and the curriculum, read the accompanying
brochure here.

Circle of Life Rediscovery and the John Muir Award

Contact us to find out how to become involved.

CLR have been offering the John Muir Award at Discovery and Explorer Level since 2006 – the first organisation in Sussex to offer this prestigious national environmental award.

 

Since then hundreds of young people have achieved the Award which at its heart recognises young people’s connection with, enjoyment of and care for wild places.

Case Study

Why are residentials so important for young people?Tiffins Boys School,  London – We begin the Award with a Woodland Day in May to start the journey, and to teach students the skills they will need for camp (Discover). They will learn fire lighting, shelter building, cooking…some of which they have never tried before. The woodland day is also an opportunity for students to join in with planning the camp activities – what else would they like to learn?

Camp takes place in June for 2 night and 3 days (Explore) and includes activities such as tool use, team building games, night stalks, cooking and plenty of adventure.
Students also take part in a conservation activity (Conserve) during camp, which could
include tree planting or clearing an area within the woodland to open up the canopy to new growth, therefore increasing the overall biodiversity of the woodland.

Tiffins School and the John Muir AwardAt the end of camp students go back to school and (Share) their experiences and learning with the rest of the school. They come away from their John Muir Award experience with more confidence, closer as a team, with a better understanding of the natural environment and having achieved a nationally-recognised award at Discovery level.


"My son is completely different since camp, he has more thinking space inside his head, he is calmer, he has changed." Parent, March 2017.
“I didn’t think that I liked camping but I have underestimated myself. The camp was amazing, I have not only learnt new skills but I have learnt to be grateful about everything around me. I have a new sense of confidence and believe in myself.”

Camp Participant, June 2017.

More information

Please contact us if you are interested in exploring the John Muir Award with Circle of Life Rediscovery. Each Award is bespoke and unique to your requirements.

Please note – we can also offer the John Muir Award as a series of day visits either on your school site, or our woodland site, or a mixture of both. The programme can be designed around your curriculum needs so do contact us to discuss this as an option, find out more.

By Katie Scanlan

We look forward to hearing from you.

Circle of Life RediscoveryCircle of Life Rediscovery also run Forest School sessions, Forest School training, woodland days, enrichment activity days, outdoor learning days, CPD for teachers and family activity days in our beautiful Sussex woodland. Please visit our website for more details or call 01273 814226.

Why overnight camps and residentials are so important!

The Importance of Residential Camps.

More and more research is coming to light to support what we in the environmental world have always asserted – being outdoors is good for you and so are residential camps!

This means not only are children able to be more active by being outside, they are also able to learn more freely, engage more readily and be inspired, encouraged, challenged and therefore improve their confidence and self-esteem.

These positive effects are amplified even more when it comes to a residential camp.

Why are residential camps so important?


“I slept alone in a shelter that I had made, I never thought I would be able to do that. I feel more confident and have overcome my fears.”
Camp Participant, June 2017

 

Learning Away

Learning Away is an initiative, funded by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, to research the benefits of residential experiences in schools. In 2015 they published a report, following 3 years of action research with over 60 schools and colleges, identifying the overall impacts of residentials for young people.

The evidence collected throughout the 3-year project showed that residentials:

  • Foster deeper relationships
  • Improve students’ resilience, self-confidence and wellbeing
  • Boost cohesion and a sense of belonging
  • Improve students’ engagement with learning
  • Improve students’ knowledge, skills and understanding
  • Support students’ achievement
  • Smooth students’ transition experiences
  • Provide opportunities for student leadership, co-design and facilitation

“Learning Away has shown that a residential learning experience provides opportunities and benefits/impacts that cannot be achieved in any other educational context or setting. The impact is greater when residential’s are fully integrated with a school’s curriculum and ethos”   York Consulting (2015)

Read the full report here.

Work on the Wild Side

In addition to the Learning Away research, a new report (May 2017), has been released that demonstrates leading schools (highest Progress 8 scores) place high value on residential experiences.

The ‘Work on the Wild Side’ report produced in partnership with Learning Away Consortium members, CLOtCIOL and AHOEC analyses the UK primary and secondary schools with the highest Progress 8 scores and winners of the Pupil Premium Awards.

The report found that “outdoor learning is valued amongst teachers, pupils, parents and inspectors and that the skills learnt outdoors are transferable to the classroom and across the academic spectrum.” Work on the Wild Side, May 2017

Given the clear benefits of outdoor learning and residential camps, more needs to be done to ensure that children and young people are provided with the opportunity to leave the classroom.

Read report in full here.

Circle of Life Rediscovery Camps

Unique residential camps with Circle of Life Rediscovery

Circle of Life Rediscovery runs unique, nature-based residential camps for young people in a beautiful woodland environment in Sussex.

Camps have a strong environmental basis and could include activities such as fire-making, tool use, cooking and foraging, team-building activities, art, story-telling, music and night walks. We also offer the John Muir Award, a National Conservation Award, at Discovery level.

“I didn’t think that I liked camping but I have underestimated myself. The camp was amazing, I have not only learnt new skills but I have learnt to be grateful about everything around me. I have a new sense of confidence and believe in myself”
Camp Participant, June 2017.

Residential camps in East Sussex

To find out more about our residential camps, watch one of our films from a Secondary School camp or Primary School camp where participants explain what they enjoyed about the camp.

Please contact us on 01273 814226 or send an email for more information if you are interested in organising a camp for your school. Each camp is bespoke and unique to your requirements.

 

There are free resources on the Learning Away website, include planning tools, models for lower cost trips and curriculum integration.

By Katie Scanlan

Circle of Life Rediscovery

 

Woodland Mayhem

GREETINGS!! Are you excited? I certainly am! I have got so much to talk about in terms of what I have been doing with Circle of Life Rediscovery recently! So, hold on to your hats and away we go…

So, as mentioned in my March blog I was taking part in a woodland day with Circle of Life Rediscovery which was in partnership with CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services). We do various woodland days together, which is all very exciting.

When CAMHS and CLR take on the adventure of spending the day in the woodland we are usually based in the woods at Bentley Wildfowl & Motor Museum, which is a stunning woodland and one of my favourites. This time was a little different, CLR decided to take us somewhere new, open our young minds to new places and new experiences… I was a little apprehensive but all the more welcoming to this new endeavour.

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