Forest School Training in Ireland!

Circle of Life Training in association with Circle of Life Rediscovery CIC offers a Level 3 Forest School Programme Leadership. We are delighted to be working in partnership with Earth Force Education to bring our ground breaking Forest School Leadership training to Ireland.

Who is the training designed for?

This Level 3 Training is designed for professionals already working with young people who wish to establish and deliver a Forest School/Environmental Education programme. It is appropriate for those over the age of 21 years with relevant qualifications including teachers, youth workers, playworkers, rangers, ecologists or teaching assistants with experience of working with young people  (at least 2 years).

What do people think about our training? See below for feedback and how to get involved!

What have you enjoyed most about this training?

Forest School Training Ireland
“How all the participants were bought together through activities, games and music and how I have noticed nature at a different level.”

“I have loved the games, songs, new ideas and learning from new people.”

“There was an excellent combination of outdoor and classroom lessons.”

 

“It was great having 3 leaders all with different experience and ideas to share.”

“Passion for the outdoors is infectious!”

Forest School Training Ireland

“The course was delivered in such a lovely way, I would love to be a child in your forest school! I have learnt more about nature and to be free of the ties and expectations of everyday life.”

“I have learnt so many practical skills as well as how to do a risk assessment!”

“I loved everything about this training, from the skills learned, enthusiasm of the trainers and have learnt so much about nature. Thank you for an amazing 5 days with a lovely team.”

“I loved using the tools, I was nervous at first but was made to feel at ease straight away.”

Forest School Training Ireland

“I enjoyed the sit spots and quite moments. The knife work was fun and challenging. You made me feel very safe and included.”

“I loved the welcoming atmosphere, the wealth of knowledge and the hands on activities.”

“I loved making crafts from natural materials found in the woods.”

How has the training personally impacted you?

“The passion of the course leaders has really inspired me.”

“The inspiring leaders have had a positive impact on me and how I work.”

Forest School Training Ireland

“I feel invigorated! I have now started to think about my own practices and bring my ideas to life.”

“I have met so many enthusiastic people on the training, I am now excited for what I can do in the future.”

“It has made me realise the importance of child led activities and has made me want to become a forest school leader.”

” I loved being in the fresh air and have felt healthier all round.”

“I had time to reflect, which I found very moving.”

Forest School Training Ireland

“The child led approach has been fascinating, I learnt to give everything a go.”

“It has been an inspiring and emotional experience (in a good way!)”

“I feel my stress levels have been reduced and you have made me re-evaluate my life. Plus, I have laughed so much! This has been the best week of my life.”

Forest School Training Ireland

 

“You have brought me out of myself and have reminded me what is important.”

This training is booked through our partner provider Earth Force Education further information can be found here.

Please contact Ciara Hinksman or call 086 3199 515 for more information about this training in Ireland.


Forest School Training in the UK

If you are looking for a course in the UK, Circle of Life Rediscovery offers a Level 3 course, commencing March 2017! Full details can be found here. The training dates are:

Part one: March 6th – 9th 2017
Part two: April 24th – 26th 2017
Part three: May 15th – 16th 2017

The training will combine key principles of Forest School with best practice from Environment and Nature Education, child development, the world of play (wild, free and therapeutic play) delivered by our professional team who have many years experience.

Please call 01273 814226 or send an email for more information.

The Web of Life

I remember many years ago reading ‘Trees are actually alive”. For me it led to a shift in awareness. I knew that trees are biologically alive, but this felt different. I still feel wonder and awe knowing that some trees suck up hundreds of gallons of water per day, transforming sunlight into sugars, and that they can regrow limbs! I couldn’t imagine a world without trees.

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It is incredible that trees are hooked up by their roots to other trees through a network of mycelium! This cooperative web of plants and trees support the fungi with food and in exchange, the fungi provide nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen. The trees, soil and sun are all interacting with each other.

 

The older, ‘hub’ trees, the elders of our land connect to hundreds of other trees. Working together the whole system is resilient.

Trees are alive

I don’t understand why we often dismiss how much the non-human world is alive. Our ancestral traditions are often written off as ‘primitive’ or ‘spiritual’ yet these people deeply felt the intrinsic ‘aliveness’ of the plant and animal kingdoms – from the trees to the stones.

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Long-standing earth-based cultures have this awareness and understanding and are experts in their fields. They are the great botanists, ecologists, zoologists, woodland/land managers.  It is only a matter of time before we have the scientific language that effectively describes this aliveness. Like us, the trees need air, water, earth and sun; they have particular characters, communication and intelligence and provide medicines. Birch trees for example have a bark that peels. It has particular medicine for psoriasis.

 

It is important to me that the experience of life and the natural world is not only understood in instrumental and mechanical ways. There are as many ways of knowing as there are trees! I love the smell of the forest, the colours of all the leaves, the shapes and textures, the peace, the creative thoughts that occur, the many sounds that are home to so many other creatures.

Access barriers

The big barrier is and always has been access to land. The new Tree Charter which is borne out of the Charter of the Forest from the 13th Century is a stark reminder of the importance of access to land.  Whoever owns land has immense power and determines the stewardship of their land.  We are all subject to the authority of whoever owns the land and much of the land continues to be held by big estates and top income earners. They manage their situation for a particular end and this always includes biological diversity. Though it must be said, they too have been guardians of our heritage and increasingly landowners are interesting in supporting ‘rewilding’. Thankfully we do have our public right of way. I support community woodlands, and am part of one in Sussex. It is a modern way of communities accessing land, (see Plunkett Foundation).

The present day situation

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We are more acutely aware than ever, that the things that benefit the people are inextricably linked to the things that benefit the non-human world. We are currently living in a vastly diminished natural environment compared even to a few hundred years ago – but we don’t feel this because we live relatively in the present, concerning ourselves with our present needs, favouring our own children, and not the future generations. Our brains scan and remember what we experience, so as our access to nature is reduced, so too is our awareness that nature exists – it is a form of cultural blindness.

To avoid this ‘blindness’ we have to expose ourselves to the trees and lap up the well-being that comes from this.

I would love to see more children playing outdoors, meeting the non-human world every day, creating brain patterns – the invisible mycelium of reciprocal relationships. I am very grateful for the tree under which I could hide and retreat in my childhood and am now very grateful to the woodlands in which I spend so much time!

Blog by Marina Robb (PGCE; Msc; MA), as part of the #TreeCharter. Marina is the Director of Circle of Life Rediscovery & Author of Learning with Nature.

Circle of Life Rediscovery provides nature based experiences and programmes that are educational, fun and often life-changing! These include funded projects with our partners that directly support health and well-being for vulnerable members of our society, days for schools or family days in the woodlands and bespoke residential camps and Forest Schools. You can gain a qualification in leading your own Forest School programme or improve your knowledge and skills with our adult training CPD days.

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Have you got a memory of being out and about in the trees and woods as a child? What do you feel are the threats that trees and woods in the UK face? Add your voice to the Charter for Trees, Woods and People.

 

 

https://www.circleofliferediscovery.com/

Tel: 01273 814226

Forest School Training with Circle of Life Rediscovery

Open College Network West Midlands, Level 3 Certificate for Forest School Leaders

Join our forest school training level 3 course in March!

At Circle of Life Rediscovery, our Forest School Training Level 3 course combines key principles of Forest School with best practice from Environment and Nature Education, child development and the world of play including wild, free and therapeutic play.

 


Who are the trainers?

Our training team includes Marina Robb, Mark Lloyd and Anna Richardson who are all qualified Forest School Leaders with backgrounds in teaching, nature connection and woodland management.

Learning with Nature
Together, they have over 40 years’ experience working outdoors and across different ages and backgrounds. Marina and Anna are authors of the popular, Learning with Nature: A how-to guide to inspiring children through games and activities’.


Who is the training for?

Forest School Training with Circle of Life Rediscovery

 

Our trainee’s come from a wide range of backgrounds including teaching, outdoor/nature/bushcraft education, play work, organisations who work with young people, or with challenging and vulnerable backgrounds. Trainee’s need to be over 21 years old and have 2 years’ experience working with young people.

 

 

 

Why do we support this approach?

There is a growing understanding of the importance of play and the outdoors for children’s health and well-being and capacity to learn. We believe play (wild, free play and therapeutic) is essential for emotional well-being and nature provides a multitude of health and learning opportunities. Research into the brain science reinforces how exploration and taking risks in the outdoors and during childhood, grows networks that support us into adulthood.

Furthermore, we believe that providing opportunities for people to experience nature is a pre-requisite for caring for nature.

How much work is there involved in forest school training?

The whole training takes about one year to complete. During that time you will have 9
face to face training days, which include all the practical and planning skills for Forest
School; child development theory, observation and listening to children; the benefits of
the outdoors and play; creating your forest school handbook: policies and risk
assessments; woodland stewardship and management.

Course content and units:

The OCN accreditation training carries a total of 18 credits at Level 3 and consists of 5 units.
Credit Value 18, GLH: 96, TQT: 180
Guided Learning hours (GLH) supervised or direct study time required for a unit.
Total Qualification Time (TQT) number of guided learning hours (GLH) plus the time taken by learner for private study or work experience. See our website to download the units in detail.

Forest School Training in East SussexOur aim is to equip you to provide a safe, fun and professional experience for young
people outdoors that above all keep you and your groups inspired and curious about life, learning and nature!

We offer our forest school training across the seasons to enable you to experience nature and experience what’s possible at different times of year! As members of the Forest School Association UK we follow the Forest School Principles and maintain high standards. In addition to this, if you do not already hold a current Outdoor First Aid certificate you will need to attend a two day outdoor First Aid Training.

Everyone who trains as a Forest School facilitator runs 6 free Forest School sessions as
part of their training. You find and assess woodland/nature space, and plan and deliver
forest school sessions that are based on your observations of the children. You write this
up and it forms part of your assessment.

Learn how to inspire others through woodland activities!What is ‘the pilot’?

Everyone who trains as a Forest School facilitator runs 6 free Forest School sessions as part of their training. You find and assess woodland/nature space, and plan and deliver forest school sessions that are based on your observations of the children. You write this
up and it forms part of your assessment.

 

 

You will need to be covered by insurance to do this – it is highly recommended you carry
out your Pilot sessions within an established organisation or school. It’s a good idea to
think about options in advance, and we can support you to find a suitable placement.
We encourage you to work alongside other learning practitioners, creating peer support
during your ‘Pilot 6 sessions’. Learning by doing, getting as much experience as possible
will increase your confidence.

What can I do once I have the qualification?

Forest School leaders work in schools, colleges, charities, early years, nature-based organisations, social services, play work, and independently. As a qualified facilitator, you will be able to take out groups of young people, families and adults outdoors enabling then to discover the natural world, themselves, increase their learning, confidence and sense of well being.

This forest school training provides a complete foundation to working in nature with groups of children of all ages and capabilities. You will learn to bring in skills you have learned (e.g fire making, shelter building, using ropes & tools, songs & foraging) when appropriate, and trust your own knowledge of the children to provide and support experiences and play opportunities that build from their own interests.

I have paediatric/occupational first aid; do I still need Outdoor First Aid?

Yes, you still need to be Outdoor First Aid trained even if you already have paediatric
training/occupational first aid. The reason is that Forest School is typically held away
from road access therefore emergency services may need to call in other rescue services
to do a stretcher carry which can take more time. Also, outdoor first aid is more specific
to what happens at Forest School.

How do I get a Disclosure Barring Service?

If you are not hold a current DBS, you can arrange this with the school or service you
offer your pilot sessions to, or go through an umbrella organisation. Please leave
enough time to do this.

What do previous participants have to say?

“This was the best training I have ever done, from any given provider!”

“If it benefits me, and my mind and sense of self, imagine what it can do for children. It’s like no training I’ve ever experienced before.”

“The training was excellent. Marina and Mark gave me the confidence to try everything and to be successful at it.”

“It was so diverse and fun, so many games, ideas and activities that I can now deliver myself in the future.”

“A great balance of theory and practical skills. Just truly an amazing experience, I feel confident to now deliver sessions.”

“As well as the training side, this has been a personal journey and helped me to rediscover and reconnect as well as great for my mind and mental health.”

WE LOVE FOREST SCHOOL!

NEXT COURSE COMMENCES MARCH 2018

2018 Training Dates: part one: March 5th – 8th 2018, part two: April 23rd – 25th 2018, part three: May 15th – 16th 2018.

Location: Our forest school training takes place at Picketts Wood, Picketts Lane, Nutley, TN22 3EG and at our stunning site at Mill Woods, near Laughton, read about it here.

To find out about our forest school training course and to book, please see our website or send an email. To chat about the training please call Marina on 01273 814226.

Circle of Life Rediscovery

An Award Winning Woodland Project for Children and Young People with Learning Disabilities and their Families

A Woodland Celebration!

Circle of Life Rediscovery (CLR) and Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust’s – Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services Learning Disability / Family Intensive Support Service (CAMHSLD/FISS) held a Celebration Day on 31st March to mark the huge success of their three year project.

“We have had a great three years working together supporting families, siblings, parents and grandparents to get outdoors, find peer support, discover new skills, have fun and relax.” Marina Robb, Founder of Circle of Life Rediscovery.

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The Woodlands Project was awarded Silver at the 2015 Sussex Partnership Positive Practice Awards and Highly Commended in the national Innovation in Child, Adolescent and Young People’s Mental Health Award presented by the Positive Practice Collaborative.

 

The Issues

Children and young people with learning disabilities often have fewer opportunities in life and their families find it harder to spend time together as a family, building the kind of memories we all expect to find in our photo albums. Furthermore, families attending our project rarely get out and some have withdrawn into their homes completely. The reasons can be shocking; being asked to get off a bus because their autistic child is anxious and making noises to communicate their distress, or other adults asking parents to remove their child from the play area because they don’t understand the non-verbal communication being used. These daily experiences of prejudice, judgement and sometimes, abuse, make day to day life even more challenging.

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These are the issues CLR and CAMHSLD/FISS decided to tackle in a programme which was specially designed, in partnership with families. The project enables them to enjoy a whole day together, to relax and have fun in each other’s company and to explore their capabilities, talents and strengths both as individuals and as a family unit. Due to the complex needs of the young people attending the activities, a very high level of support is put in place with each family being supported by one staff member from CLR and one from CAMHSLD/FISS.

 

So far 150 people have attended and benefited from this project over the past three years. Learning has happened on all sides. Families have gained woodland skills and can now build and cook on a campfire, some have learnt safe saw and drill use. Families have learnt that they can access the outdoors and that when they do, they feel much calmer and more resilient. Parents and siblings have met other people who share their experiences and found that sharing their stories is deeply supportive.

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We know that there is very little provision for families to stay together as a whole unit when there is a child with a learning disability. Most of the support offered consists of respite which splits the family up and they have told us how limiting this is. We have also learnt that families that are already coping with high levels of distress are subject to daily experiences of rejection and threat in their own communities. And finally, we have seen first-hand, the healing power of getting together with peers in woodland. As one parent said, “the trees are drinking my stresses.”

 

The Project

The Woodland Project aims to make a relaxing, whole family day a reality; stretching young people to learn new skills and discover new talents and supporting parents so they could find peace, and create fun memories of their time together. Typically a day begins with songs around a main fire before tuition in building a cooking fire is given. After lunch, woodland crafts are the order of the day with young people learning how to safely use a saw or drill. Throughout, access to hammocks and swings provides quieter, reflective spaces if children feel over stimulated by the new sensations available to them.

The project seeks to challenge some of the assumptions that limit the experience of young people with learning disabilities. In addition the goal is to equip adults with the necessary skills and key safety knowledge to give them the confidence to make choices to go outdoors independently of the project.

See our wonderful film about our Woodland Project:

Photos from our Woodland Days can be seen here.

Photos from our Celebration Day can be seen here.

Feedback from a parent

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“We had a brilliant day and felt very relaxed. The children loved the woods and the quiet life and thoroughly enjoyed on how to make camp fires and cook on a camp fire. This environment is really perfect and safe for children, who love the outdoors and learning new things. The staff were brilliant and made us feel very welcome and very supportive. Would love to come back again as the day was great and the kids were kept busy from beginning to end.”

 

 

Quote from Clinical Psychologist

“Spending time in a new environment, away from usual routines, provided a space for the family to interact with each other in a different way. As parents have support from staff at the woodland they are able to relax and engage with their children in a way that is not always possible in everyday life. Parents were also able to connect with other parents. This is not usually easy for parents or carers of a child with a learning disability as transport is often arranged to take the child to school, so they do not have the opportunity to meet and talk to other parents.”

“As a clinician the day provided a unique opportunity to get to know the family in a way that is not possible in the course of normal clinical work. It facilitated relationship building with the family as well as providing an opportunity to observe family dynamics in a completely natural, unobtrusive way.”

Feedback from parents:

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“I can’t express enough how much relaxing, healing and peace there has been for me today.”

 

 

20150613_105416 “This is not the kind of place we would normally come to so it has been a nice change. It makes me think we will come back. You forget it doesn’t have to be structured such as a playground. It has been good that we have been outdoors rather than in a play centre or community hall.”


WHY NATURE MATTERS

Nature has an extraordinary way of bringing out the best in people.

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Circle of Life Rediscovery bases all its work around nature. It now has information gathered from over 15 years of why nature matters. The belief that change comes with the right environment to be able to try new things is at the heart of this nature work.

It’s a simple thing to go out into nature, and yet so many people don’t think of it or because they don’t do it often are afraid of it. We use it to support our work and in return we feel nature has exceptional ways of teaching so much that can be used in everyday life.

Find out more about our Funded work here.

SUPPORT OUR PROJECT

If you would like to make a donation to support the future of our Woodland Days, please click here or contact us at info@circleofliferediscovery.com. Any funds received will help to provide much needed disabled toilets, containers for tools and temporary structures for shelters.

Leaky Buckets GIG on 29th and 30th April

The Leaky Buckets are back at Iford Village Hall on 29th and 30th April with a new set of songs to get you on your feet! The evening includes a cash bar, barbeque and a collection to support our Funded Projects. Please come along – we hope to see you there! Entry is FREE but must be pre-booked. Please see details here.

Circle of Life Rediscovery would like to thank to NHS England for supporting us over the last 3 months; to SPARK for their Life More Ordinary Grant support and to all the families, staff and people who helped shape this project.

About Circle of Life Rediscovery
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Circle of Life Rediscovery is a Community Interest Company based in Ringmer, East Sussex that provides funded and bespoke learning with nature experiences and training for young people, adults, families, schools and organisations.

Our team of outdoor Learning specialists are passionate about nature and our aim is to share our knowledge and expertise with the next generation while helping to boost self-esteem, confidence, communication skills as well as physical development.

About Sussex Partnership

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Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust provides NHS mental health, specialist learning disability and substance misuse services across and beyond Sussex.

Swings, Ropes & Woodland Cooking

The use of ropes for making and cooking is endless! During our course back in April with Mark Lloyd, participants learnt to make rope from local plants, discover recipes using wild woodland ingredients, learn team building games and crafts.

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Here, we share some of our wonderful feedback from the course participants.

What did you enjoy about the training day?
It was very interactive and I learnt a lot of new things that I will be able to apply to my role.”
“Friendly and knowledgeable trainer, well planned session with good progression of difficulty, learned lots of new skills, had fun and the weather was great.”
“I enjoyed the practical hands on training which was lots of fun. A great team building day!”
“It was nice to spend time together as a staff/volunteer team. It was very relaxed atmosphere and beautiful weather!”

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What was most useful about the training?
How to build rope swings and ladders and learning the different knots.”
“Learning new skills and practising them in the woods. We all got to a good level of competency with the knots and I felt really pleased that I mastered something new.”
“It has equipped me with new skills and ideas to use with groups I work with. Such simple and low cost ideas that can effectively create lots of safe risk taking for children.”
“Finding out simple ways to make exciting things for kids to climb on. So simple that they’ll be able to do it to.”

How could the training be improved?
“No suggestions”
“It was spot on!”
“It couldn’t”

Would you recommend this training to others? If yes, what would you say?
Yes, it was very hands on, enjoyable and informative.”
“Yes – I would say it was really well delivered, good content and a lot of fun.”
“Yes – well structured and fun. I’m looking forward to putting my new skills to use!”
“Yes – these are the kind of skills that are simple to learn and (once remembered!) will provide fun for children and young people for ever.”

At Circle of Life Rediscovery, we offer a variety of adult training courses, workshops and CPD days throughout the year. For further information about how you can get involved, please visit our website.

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Our next Outdoor Learning courses are as follows:

Autumn Nature Based Plant & Games Day – 23rd September, Ringmer, East Sussex.
This training is for teachers and TA’s of reception through to KS4 as well as Forest School Practitioners and others working with young people of all ages. It will equip practitioners to safely inspire young people to build their own knowledge of plants, to work through the risks, benefits and opportunities of incorporating local plants into your practice to inspire a life-long love of learning! Find out more.

Forest School & Play Therapy – 20th October, Ringmer, East Sussex.
This one-day training is for teachers, TA’s, Forest School Practitioners and others working with young people of all ages. The day will combine Forest School and Play Therapy and introduce you to how to provide a therapeutic space for young people. Find out more.

As the summer holidays come to an end and Autumn creeps upon us, we reflect on the past year and plan the year ahead. If you would like to find out about our School Camps, Forest School, Activity Days and Transformative Learning Training please visit our website. We are currently taking bookings for the year ahead, please do contact us as soon as possible!

Email: info@circleofliferediscovery.com

Tel: 01273 814226

www.circleofliferediscovery.com

Learning with Nature

In our time of fast-paced, exam-pressured, high-tech culture, where does learning with nature have a place?

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When adults are asked to recall a time in their youth when they were happiest, invariably they refer to times spent outdoors and with friends. Our clever screen world keeps us busy and on the go, but does not help us to communicate, feel loved, gain the satisfaction of the quiet mind, and relax. Time with others in nature does exactly that — and much, much more!

Engaging and Thriving
We need an education that includes learning and understanding how the world is much more than human-centered, and that instills in us a sense of belonging and curiosity about life. When subject learning takes place outside, it becomes embodied and has greater meaning. Our work aims to bring the subjects outside while building meaningful relationships with the natural world. For example, a tree becomes a living being with its own characteristics and often with healing properties. The class “builds a tree” using all the parts: the bark, xylem, cambium, sapwood, heartwood, roots, and leaves. Real experiences build empathy, a hallmark of a healthy human.

In language arts classes, sensory description supports a good piece of creative writing and generally helps the reader to be “in” the piece. If we ask students to describe what things smell and sound like, their attention is drawn to notice the smells of soil, how rough some tree bark may feel, or the sound of the wind through branches. One consequence of this sensory focus is improved, descriptive writing full of imagination — with an added bonus of high marks on writing assignments!

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Young children thrive outdoors. They develop their sense of balance by moving, not by sitting down, and exploring the world around them. We all need encouragement to take risks, building up our resilience and confidence — the skills that will equip us all our life.

We live in a time where disconnection is rife. It is common for 14-year-olds to not know that a book is made from a tree or that the fuel for their school bus comes from the earth long before it comes from the petrol station.

We have taken hundreds of young people out into nature for a one-time afternoon session, overnight or weeklong camping trips, and regular on going woodland programs. We have worked with young people from a wide diversity of backgrounds. The satisfaction of seeing them transform from indoor kids afraid of nature, recoiling at the yuck factor and the thought of getting dirty, to brave young adventurers diving into bushes to hide from the “eagle eyes” that will be looking for them in “3, 2, 1…” makes it all worth the effort.

Outdoor Learning
There are hundreds of activities that we could suggest, but here are a couple of the simplest, most accessible, and effective.

Try a scavenger hunt in an outdoor area. In small groups or in pairs, children must seek different objects that you have written on their list, such as:

A feather
An acorn
Something that’s been eaten
Something that smells
A seed
Something that’s rough
Something that’s heavy
Something yellow
An animal hair

Depending on your age group, it can be fun to add objects that engage the imagination even more, such as something that could be a gnome’s hat. Once many objects have been gathered, you could use them in many ways depending on your aims and objectives. You could talk about classification and group the objects according to whether they belong to the animal, mineral, or plant kingdoms. You might keep some of the more robust items in a bag and have a child feel inside, pick one up, and describe what he or she can feel while the others guess, thus developing vocabulary and understanding of adjectives.

20150523_142734Before launching into any biology around botany, plant life, and transpiration, it can be a fun challenge to try doing leaf puzzles with your class. This is just like a jigsaw puzzle. We start by choosing a leaf that is at least as long as an adult’s palm and tearing it into four or more pieces (depending on age and ability of your students). Give each child a single torn leaf and break the class into pairs. Partners trade leaves and try to put the puzzle back together again. Children often soon notice how the veins can help them in rearranging their leaves and detecting differences in the upper and lower sides. Just be mindful not to include any leaves that could be toxic. Common examples that work well include hazel, lime, oak, and dandelion.

In the end, we hope that our children will be healthy and happy, and that they’ll have a good future. It’s unusual to hear people ask whether nature has a place in education. How can it not? The most important question of our time is how we can look after the natural world, because we need so much from it to sustain us. The future belongs to a generation who figures out how to do this.

Marina Robb and Victoria Mew. Authors of ‘Learning with Nature’.

Whose Tracks? Answers here!

Did you have fun with the kids guessing who made the tracks on our recent activity sheet?

Click here to view our answer sheet!

Keep your eye on our emails to download the next FREE activity sheet – coming soon just in time for the Easter break. Packed with quizzes, games and guess the egg!kids-walk-wood-parent

Need Easter holiday ideas? Why not come along to our family day on 7th April. Fun in the woods for the entire family including games, activities and crafts. Take some time out and connect with nature, inspire your children and most importantly – have fun!

 

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2014 Forest School Leadership Training – Participant Feedback

Circle of Life Rediscovery offers Forest School Programme Leadership at it’s best!  We bring together years of experience of working with young people outdoors combined with a great understanding of how to build their self-esteem, resiliance and a long-lasting appreciation of the natural world.

Please find below short interviews with past participants:

To find out more about becoming a forest school leader please click here.

Forest School Leadership Programme (Level 3 Certificate) Feedback

Why did you choose this training?

“I don’t feel I’ve got the skills in outdoor education, I was drawn to watching other people do their sessions and I love seeing young people get really engaged with being outdoors. Listening to people who have done Marina’s courses before I found that there is a lot more depth to it, it’s more multi-layered than some of the more basic bushcraft courses.”

“I met someone who knew about this training and they said to me “If you want to do one, that’s the one to do!” – and he was right!”

“It gives you a fuller more holistic approach rather than just telling you how to do the do, it gives you more of an ethos behind what is important in Forest School and Nature Awareness.”

Continue reading

Forest School and Environmental Education Training Level 3

The 1st – 5th October kicked off Circle of Life Rediscovery’s  Forest School and Environmental Education Level 3 training with a group of 14 enthusiastic individuals, ready and eager to learn about the Forest School ethos and more about outdoor learning at Bentley Wildfowl. The group gathered on Monday morning bright eyed and raring to go.

Want to hear their feedback? Here are just some of the responses…

What have you most enjoyed about this training?

Everything! An amazing team of experts, I have learnt so much, skills and about myself.

Continue reading