First by the heart before understood by the mind – Ecopsychology, environmental and art therapy in practice.

Ecopsychology, Environmental and Art Therapy in practice.

We are really looking forward to Ian Siddons Heginworth coming to run a 2 day workshop for us in March ‘Exploring the Natural World and the Feeling Self – Alchemical Ash’, an ecopsychology and practical therapeutic training.  Ian is a highly experienced and creative practitioner who is both insightful and accessible.

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Ecopsychology, environmental and art therapy in practice.I have owned his book ‘Environmental Arts therapy and the Tree of Life’ for many years, and am forever impressed by the depth and breadth of how his writing links our psychology with nature, and in particular the Celtic wisdom of the trees.

For those of us who work with nature as a source of healing, learning,  creativity and inspiration, these days will lead us to understanding how our true selves are intimately entwined and connected to Nature and her cycles.  Ecopsychology, art and environmental experiences are therapeutic. From the physical experience, the absorption of plant hormones that lower our cortisol,  to emotional and psychological experiences that are supported and unravelled through nature’s language of metaphor.

About the Workshops

The training will apply the therapeutic use of natural materials, natural locations, natural themes and natural cycles and promises practical ecopsychology where we can explore our difficulties and let nature transform them.   At Circle of Life we offer transformational programmes and approaches that draw on old and new wisdom and all of us are willing to learn more about how nature’s gifts can help us to ‘be’ in life, and live in a connected and fulfilling way. We also know that exploring our ‘shadow’ (See our course in April – Nature Play & The Therapeutic Space) and feelings are necessary to be mentally well and enable us to transform and change.  Our work with all ages and background in nature repeatedly shows us the power of nature for long lasting well-being.

Ian’s fine work explores our masculine (the active and outward parts of ourselves) and the feminine (the feeling, inward part of ourselves that receives form the world).  It offers us a way to reconsider our daily life as the year turns around through the months and seasons.  It shows us how we can reconnect to the disowned parts of ourselves that are the compost of our health.

As a Forest School trainer and group facilitator, I hope to integrate the practical knowledge of working and offering activities through the year, with the psychological benefits that nature and these methods affords us.

Ogham Tree Alphabet

This intimate relationship with the living world was not unusual for our ancestors.  Trees have always been of paramount importance.  There is enormous cultural and medicinal value of the trees.  For us in the West, our Celtic ancestors lived in a forested land and a secret form of written language was called the Ogham.  The earliest known form of Ogham was the Tree Ogham or Celtic Tree Alphabet.  Each letter was associated with a name of a tree. The Celtic year had thirteen months with each month associated with a tree.

Ogham Tree Alphabet

 

 

“Each month has offered us the Tree of Life in a different guise” Ian Siddons Heginworth.

 

 

Exploring the Natural World and the Feeling Self – Alchemical Ash

This training will apply the therapeutic use of natural materials, natural locations, natural themes and natural cycles. The first of two workshops will be held over the Spring Equinox and focus on the Ash – Alchemical Ash. In ancient Britain the Ash was associated with rebirth and new life.  The beginning of March is the time of year when we feel the promise of Spring and we long for it’s arrival, but winter is still here. By the end of March, it will have arrived!

Exploring the Natural World and the Feeling Self – Suffocating Ivy

Ecopsychology, environmental and art therapy in practice.

The second in Autumn, ‘Suffocating Ivy’ – associated with death as well as life, as the female body gives life, so woman brings death. “September comes and the night creeps in…  Even before the leaves start yellowing we know autumn is here….Life is beginning to pull inwards.”  For the Celts, the ivy  is considered the strongest of trees because it can choke and kill anything it grows on, even the great Oak.  The Ivy can help us to meet that which blocks our path to freedom.

 

If you would like to find out more about our ecopsychology and practical therapeutic trainings with Ian please visit our website.

We look forward to meeting you under the trees at Mill Wood finding our freedom, love, innocence and renewal but perhaps not before we meet our loss and feelings felt too by our heart.

Marina Robb – Director, Circle of Life Rediscovery

ANON: Poem found in the Plough Inn, Myddfai, Dyfed, 1998

“Beechwood fires are bright and clear, If the logs are kept a year. Chestnut’s only good they say, If for long laid away. Make a fire of Elder tree, Death within your house shall be.  But ash new or ash old, Is fit for a queen with a crown of gold.

Birch and fir logs burn to fast, Blaze up bright and do not last. It is by the Irish said, Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread, Elm wood burns like churchyard mould, E’en the flames are cold.  But ash green or ash brown, Is fit for a queen with a golden crown.

Poplar gives a bitter smoke, Fills your eyes and makes you choke, Applewood will scent your room, With an incense-like perfume. Oaken logs if dry and old, Keep away the winter’s cold.  But ash new or ash old, Is fit for a queen with a crown of gold”.

Ian Siddons Heginworth - Ecopsychology, environmental and art therapy in practice.

 

Ian is a leading practitioner, innovator and teacher of environmental arts therapy, a practical ecopsychologist, Author of ‘Environmental Arts Therapy and the Tree of Life’.

Please see his website for more information.

 

 

Circle of Life Rediscovery provides exciting and highly beneficial nature-centred learning and therapeutic experiences for young people, adults, and families in Sussex woodlands, along with innovative continuing professional development for the health, well being and teaching professionals who are supporting them.

Circle of Life RediscoveryTransforming education, health and family through nature.

www.circleofliferediscovery.com

Tel: 01273 814226

Email: info@circleofliferediscovery.com

 

Our Teenage Woodland Programme, by Emma Thorne

Grab your wellington boots, gather the kindling, and have those marshmallows toasting at the ready. Why I hear you say? Because the Teenage Woodland Days are back and I for one cannot wait.


At the beginning of 2017 Circle of Life Rediscovery in partnership with East Sussex CAMHS (Discovery College) successfully secured a grant from ITV’s The People’s Projects. This well earnt money will be used to fund the upcoming Teenage Woodland Days, as well CLR/CAMHS-LD/FISS Family days.

As a CAMHS Peer Trainer I feel very excited about the forthcoming project, particularly as I had such close involvement in spreading the word and rallying up the support for it through its stages of public voting. Yes, this Peer Trainer was even featured on ITV Meridian doing just that, although I will confess that the fame has yet to go to my head.

Asides from getting back out into the ever changing mystical woodland, I’m especially looking forward to working with the fantastically enthusiastic young people whom have been previously involved in woodland projects. Their continued energy and passion for being outdoors is wonderful to watch. But one thing that I’m really hoping for is that there will be some new faces on our Teenage Programme. The woodland welcomes all to its beautifully calm space and all you need is an open mind and an invitation to yourself to allow your senses to take in the wonder of nature and its beauty, as it changes throughout the seasons.

The weather is already beginning to change and soon it’ll become more apparent that Autumn is ready and waiting to announce its presence. The leaves will darken and fall to the ground and suddenly the annual childlike desire to crunch all over them underfoot becomes all too irresistible. The changing of the seasons is something that I’m most excited about in relation to the upcoming woodland days. The programme will run from September 2017 through to July 2018. All four seasons will be experienced over that period of time and I’m intrigued to watch how the woodland changes in its entirety.


So, are you between the ages of 13-19 and are experiencing mental health difficulties? Why not try something new, take an exploration into the heart of the woodland or simply unleash your inner Bear Grylls and start learning how to build a fire whilst cooking something delicious on it to enjoy.

Come along and you won’t be disappointed, although I cannot guarantee that you won’t get muddy – see you in the woods!

 

Weekend Dates:
2017
September 16thOctober 23rdNovember 18th,
2018
January 13thFebruary 3rdMarch 3rdApril 6thMay 19thJune 9th, July 7th & 8th.
Celebration Event
May 29th – all families & supporters welcome.

Where:
Mill Wood, Vert Woods Community Woodland, Park Lane, Laughton, Lewes, East Sussex BN8 6BP (map available on request).

Times:
10am – 3.30pm.

Trainers:
Mark Lloyd, Rivkah Cummerson, Luke Funnel, Marina Robb and Emma Thorne.

How to sign up:
To register for a course all you or your supporter (relatives, friends and carers) need to do is:
Phone: 0300 303 8086
Email: sussex.recoverycollege@nhs.net or
Write: to Discovery College, Aldrington House, 35 New Church Road, Hove, BN3 4AG giving the titles of the courses you would like to attend and your address.

A registration from will then be sent to you by post for you to fill in. If you find completing the form is difficult for any reason, please call us to confirm you can attend the first session and come along with your form, so we can support you to complete it. We can do a home visit if you would find that helpful.

If you have any questions about registration please contact Rivkah Cummerson, CAMHS Participation Manager, tel:  07876 037478.

For any questions about the content of the programme please contact Mark Lloyd, Circle of Life Rediscovery, tel: 07961 015307.

 

Jon Cree – Mill Woods, A Place for Play and Deep Learning

Jon Cree – Mill Woods, A Place for Play and Deep Learning

Late winter 2017 around the time of imbolc, as we emerged into the lengthening days, Jon Cree joined us in the woods to facilitate two training days on Story and Play Structures:

Story Telling with Jon Cree“My initial reticence of working with fairly large groups soon evaporated into the soil, with the rain, when I got to the site (I know that sounds a contradiction but illustrates well the circles in time we all experience through the seasons).

Greeted by the smiles and warmth of Marina and Mark, the fire, chestnuts, oaks, spruces, pines, willows, birches, great tits, green woodpeckers to name a few other citizens – of course.

This atmosphere made for opportunities to explore the magic and meaning in story and story-making as well as a purposeful place for trying out our hand-tool skills and engage the body in playful exploits that resulted in ladder climbing, rope swinging, strap line wobbling and the makings of a tree-house!

Storying

Join our courses with Jon Cree in 2018!I never tire of witnessing people digging into their imaginative domains and creating from this many wordplay narratives around natural world discoveries that then move on to story.

Armed with the elements of tension, hero journeys, tragedies, helpers and victories story is realised.  The power of the imagination is truly infinite and seeing educators realise their potential to story a place and their own lives always enriches.

By giving permission to play with words, lie and offer some simple frameworks, our own storyteller can be realised…..but the thing, for me, that really provides stimulation is a safe place for experimentation and ‘play’, free of judgment, IS the natural world, and if a fire is present then all the better.

On that damp day in January our spirits were lifted by giants conjuring up rabbits and elfish boats and deep stirrings in the labyrinthine earth bound passages for the dark side to preside in….for moments we were spellbound then lifted by lighthearted fantastical creations!

Play Structures

Play Structures with Jon Cree in 2018A month later I approached the Play Structures day with an “irish being”, full of the Irish passion and  blarney…giving me confidence to try the truckers hitch song to start the session – check it out.

Once again that playful permission gave me confidence to try something new and although the song didn’t quite work out how I wanted….it seemed to provide permission for folks to play.

With saws, axes, knives and ropes we made A frame ladders that turned into climbing frames…..all in a safe but experimental way (don’t worry all the tool procedures were in place and no limbs were lost!).

Join our Play Structures course with Jon Cree in 2018We made rope swings and bounced on rope courses thanks to the tensioning truckers knot, and learned the rudimentaries of tree house construction minimising any harm to the tree through the use of tree clamps.

The day ended by testing the sense of balance, that is always enhanced by the willingness to play.

If training isn’t about ‘playing’, mentally and physically, with ideas and constructs then I don’t know what it is about!

I will be back in 2018 – find out when here.”

 

By Jon Cree, Acting Treasurer, National and International Representation, The Forest School Association

2018 Dates

Story Telling with Jon Cree – 25th January 2018

Play & The Ludic Cycle with Jon Cree – 26th January 2018

Play Structures with Jon Cree – 26th & 27th February 2018

Please visit the website for full details.

Circle of Life Rediscovery

Fire Quest – Stories from the Fire

Fire Quest – Stories from the Fire

In September 2016 we embarked on a weekend of Sacred Fire & Fire Quest with both adults and young people coming together to undergo a Rite of Passage. As a culture we have all but lost our traditional ways to mark transitions and to support us to move to another stage of life and relationship to the natural world.

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In 2017 we look forward to welcoming Salvatore Gencarelle from the Helpers Mentoring Society to share teachings and offer immersions through the ‘Living Fire Course’ – a four part training throughout the year commencing May 2017 (exact dates TBC). This offers an opportunity to adults to undergo a Rite, then support young people to do this in Part 3. For more information about this click here.

 

DANIEL FORD, from the University of Hull joined us in September to record his impressions and to begin to share the experience to others beyond the forest.

“We are forest people, and our stories and social networks are forest born”.
(Sara Maitland, Gossip from the Forest, 2012, p. 9)

“I prefer being in the forest than in school and I believe the more important lessons can be found there”.
(Teenage Fire Quest Participant 2016)

Stories from the Fire

It is dawn. Raven calls ring out through the wood, stark over the distant sound of traffic. The calls are not being made by birds but rather by a small group of people who, having tended a community fire throughout the night, are now making the agreed signal of return for those out beyond the encampment. Before long men, women and children emerge from the trees and gather together in a large circle. Some take seats, whilst others move closer to the fire. The man who has held vigil at the fire throughout the night, the acknowledged teacher and leader, sits on the far side of the circle silently welcoming those who are returning. When quiet descends on the gathering he asks for those present to sing the song or tell the story that has made it itself known throughout the night. Individuals are called upon to tell their stories, to share their visions and sing their songs from the solitary quests that began at dusk and that have now ended with first light. Those that have worked with these Fire Quest participants as guides gently encourage the members of their groups to share their experiences of being out in the wood, alone with their own fire.

InipiThe first group speak a little about their unexpected experience of time throughout the night. They talk of how they spent their time in preparation for their quests, how they tackled time passing in the wood through the night, and of how they collectively believed that dawn was breaking only to realise that it was the unexpected brightness of the full moon rising. There are murmurs and nods of affirmation from the others seated in the circle acknowledging shared experiences.

Attention moves to the next group. A teenage boy, standing in the outer circle, speaks out. He makes a statement that he feels sums up his quest, “that you don’t really miss something until it’s gone, but if you look hard enough you can bring it back”. He recounts how he slipped in and out of a pattern of sleep and attentiveness throughout the night accidentally allowing his own fire to die out in the process. Despite almost being overwhelmed by darkness he tells how he was able to re-kindle his fire from just an ember. An adult at the far side of the circle celebrates both his mistakes and his determination by offering a personal insight “that we can give things away, all of us, without tending to ourselves”.

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Returning to the sharing of stories around the circle a teenage girl is called on to speak of her experience. She begins by recounting the personal question that she took into the forest with her. “How can the dark be a friend, how can it be kin, and how can I not be afraid”. She speaks matter-of-factly about how her time spent in selecting and preparing her space for the night helped to settle her anxiety and make the experience literally grounded and friendly.

As the sharing at the fireside continues a boy is invited to share the song that he ‘received’ whilst he was out in the wood throughout the night. His voice is fragile at first and the group, perhaps through solidarity of experience, begin to sing with him. The song is a simple, repeated refrain giving shape to the boy’s experience.

I’ll be climbing in the treetops,
I’ll be hiding in the bracken,
I’ll be running with the wolves,
and I will find you.

He tells the assembled group that the focus of his thinking through the night was a question about how he could learn the land and that the song was his answer. The guide of the group explains that there were also many questions from the young participants “around school and college with the question – what shall I do?” being a common theme.

A teenage girl, seated cross-legged by the community fire, continues with this thread on behalf of the next group. She speaks of how her fire bundle flared as she left the community fire at dusk on her way back alone to her chosen site and how it burnt out completely. She recounts how she retraced her steps along the path and found an ember. In the darkness she carried the ember back through the wood to her fire site and was able to bring the fire back to life. The girl continues to speak of insight gained through the process of tending fire and tending herself throughout the night. She says that she feels now “that growing in knowing is not an intellectual activity, that it is active and located in action”. To clarify her point she talks about working with her personal questions. She says that she recognised that she “had the need, the knowledge, the awareness that she had questions that needed answering but not sure about what they are or were… this led to the realisation that it is action itself that leads to knowing, and that this in turn leads to questions arising”. The teacher smiles on the opposite side of the circle.

The teacher continues by addressing the group as a community in relation to the girls sharing. He speaks of a teacher from his own wisdom tradition. “Black Elk, was an Indian elder and he had essential things to say about processing what happens out there, he spoke beautifully about this and although I not want to paraphrase – his message was this: ‘a vision without action is just a dream’”.

As the last group are invited to share their experiences attention turns to a teenage boy who decided not to venture out into the wood and instead remained behind with the teachers and guides, tending the fire throughout the night on behalf of the community, creating a link with all those out in the darkness.

Greenland sunset 4The sharing and harvesting of stories and experiences in the circle reaches its conclusion. The teacher finally turns to a woman who had joined the morning circle late and who was clearly upset and had been crying. The woman had been a key part of the ceremonies of the weekend and held an opening gratitude ceremony where all participants shared a little of their thanks for the coming experience and for life itself. She is asked if she will share her story of the night. Holding back her tears she begins.

It was a glorious night, with the strong light of a full moon and a sweet breeze. It passed slowly. I dozed occasionally, my fire dozing with me but rising back up every time I tended to it. I watched the fires of the young ones around me, rising and falling similarly to mine. I tracked the length of the night with the moon as it passed over us and with the change in traffic noise. We were near a main road and as the night wore on, the sound of traffic dropped until we were finally in total silence. In the depth of the night I heard a tawny owl call out a few times and the sound of a fox barking. The moonlight was so bright that I found myself listening out for a chorus of birdsong to confirm the approach of morning. We had been given strict instructions that our fires needed to be fully extinguished before we left them and tending the fire down to cold was an important element of the whole. I sat there, spreading the coals around with a stick and watching the embers sparkling up at me. I heard a crow call. I heard a great tit. And then I heard the traffic start up again, and the sound of traffic increasing. There was no further birdsong… The commuters were already on their way towards London and I knew that morning was upon us. And that’s when I began to drop into a well of grief. I sat there. Where were the rest of the birds? What were we facing as humanity? Going to work day in day out, by car, coming home by car, windows and doors closed to the elements, the wildlife leaving us… What have we done to the Earth? Stirring the last of the hot coals, listening to the traffic, pondering and feeling, I could not leave my site – I did not want to return. I just sat there in my well of sorrow.

At my most grief-stricken I heard the sound of movement in the branches above me. A few leaves fluttered down and then acorns started landing around me. As I looked up I saw a squirrel on one of the branches, looking down and scolding me in a way that only squirrels can. I had to laugh at myself. If nature communicates with us through signs and symbols, the different metaphors that emerge from a flying acorn brings us much information. Who knows what will happen in the future after all. Those young ones out there all night, tending to their own fires, igniting their passion and their personal fire – what acorns were being planted in them that night? How the Earth is now is how they know it to be. They have never seen a murmuration of starlings, chased butterflies or tripped over hedgehogs nightly. I realised that my grief was for how it was when I was a child and how it used to be. The weight of age.

Many, many people around us today are committed to doing what they can to change the world. We are planting acorns, both arboreal and metaphoric. With the energy and the optimism of youth – well maybe there is still hope for the future of my grandchildren and the future generations of all living things. I’ll keep praying that is so.

After this final story, the sharing of which leaves those listening in deep reflection, the group is invited to pay its respects to the site itself and encouraged to leave the woodland in better condition than they found it. The preparation to leave is unhurried and leisurely, with participants returning to their individual sites, raking over coals, covering fire pits with disturbed earth, and scattering leaves with the aim of leaving no trace of human activity. Once this had been satisfactorily completed people begin to clear away their belongings, leaving the wood without apparent sentimentality or the need to effuse to one another about the power of what has been shared.

The Fire Quest itself had been led by a man who openly drew on the traditional wisdom of his own culture, and of his own teachers and elders. This cultural aspect of the Fire Quest suggested that “the role of indigenous cultures” was to “ensure that each community member develops into a healthy and happy human being”. Promoted as a “rite of passage, which was historically used as a means to mark and support the transition from childhood into young adulthood” this development would be brought about through “processes to facilitate the transitions between the stages. Individuals were enabled to unfold and blossom into their own personalities and gifts, with responsibility, aliveness and incredible joy”.

Although the processes of this Fire Quest had now been completed, the unfolding and blossoming of the young participants was perhaps only just beginning.

Daniel Ford is a doctoral research student and the recipient of a Freedom to Learn scholarship from the Faculty of Education at the University of Hull. He is currently working on an inquiry into what happens when young people have wild experiences within and alongside their formal education.

Correspondence: d.ford@2015.hull.ac.uk

For details on The Living Fire course with Sal Gencarelle, commencing in May 2017, please see the Circle of Life Rediscovery website.

Swings, Ropes & Woodland Cooking

The use of ropes for making and cooking is endless! During our course back in April with Mark Lloyd, participants learnt to make rope from local plants, discover recipes using wild woodland ingredients, learn team building games and crafts.

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Here, we share some of our wonderful feedback from the course participants.

What did you enjoy about the training day?
It was very interactive and I learnt a lot of new things that I will be able to apply to my role.”
“Friendly and knowledgeable trainer, well planned session with good progression of difficulty, learned lots of new skills, had fun and the weather was great.”
“I enjoyed the practical hands on training which was lots of fun. A great team building day!”
“It was nice to spend time together as a staff/volunteer team. It was very relaxed atmosphere and beautiful weather!”

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What was most useful about the training?
How to build rope swings and ladders and learning the different knots.”
“Learning new skills and practising them in the woods. We all got to a good level of competency with the knots and I felt really pleased that I mastered something new.”
“It has equipped me with new skills and ideas to use with groups I work with. Such simple and low cost ideas that can effectively create lots of safe risk taking for children.”
“Finding out simple ways to make exciting things for kids to climb on. So simple that they’ll be able to do it to.”

How could the training be improved?
“No suggestions”
“It was spot on!”
“It couldn’t”

Would you recommend this training to others? If yes, what would you say?
Yes, it was very hands on, enjoyable and informative.”
“Yes – I would say it was really well delivered, good content and a lot of fun.”
“Yes – well structured and fun. I’m looking forward to putting my new skills to use!”
“Yes – these are the kind of skills that are simple to learn and (once remembered!) will provide fun for children and young people for ever.”

At Circle of Life Rediscovery, we offer a variety of adult training courses, workshops and CPD days throughout the year. For further information about how you can get involved, please visit our website.

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Our next Outdoor Learning courses are as follows:

Autumn Nature Based Plant & Games Day – 23rd September, Ringmer, East Sussex.
This training is for teachers and TA’s of reception through to KS4 as well as Forest School Practitioners and others working with young people of all ages. It will equip practitioners to safely inspire young people to build their own knowledge of plants, to work through the risks, benefits and opportunities of incorporating local plants into your practice to inspire a life-long love of learning! Find out more.

Forest School & Play Therapy – 20th October, Ringmer, East Sussex.
This one-day training is for teachers, TA’s, Forest School Practitioners and others working with young people of all ages. The day will combine Forest School and Play Therapy and introduce you to how to provide a therapeutic space for young people. Find out more.

As the summer holidays come to an end and Autumn creeps upon us, we reflect on the past year and plan the year ahead. If you would like to find out about our School Camps, Forest School, Activity Days and Transformative Learning Training please visit our website. We are currently taking bookings for the year ahead, please do contact us as soon as possible!

Email: info@circleofliferediscovery.com

Tel: 01273 814226

www.circleofliferediscovery.com

Advanced Connection Practices: Healing the Hoop of Life:

Indigenous Ceremony

can cure modern “Dis-ease”

People from all walks of life are becoming more aware that we are trapped in an ever darkening shadow of modern life. From the time of our birth we’ve been program to disconnect from what is truly important and fulfilling in life. Our childhood education institutions take us out of nature and guide us to suppress our true selves, ensuring that we fit the societal mold. We learn from a system which ensures diminished creativity, vitality, and fulfillment – we are taught that material gain is more important. Through this process we become slaves to a system that is unsustainable and highly destructive. Many of us have grown up to work at faceless jobs perusing elusive fulfillment; grasping for comfort of the material world only to find the gratification is temporary. I frequently hear statements about how we all seem to be stuck in endless pattern which appear hopeless. This is a system of disconnection.

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Jonathan Porritt at the South Downs National Park Conference

Jonathan Porritt has spent over 30 years or more caring for nature and finding ways to support healthy economies, educational and natural systems.

Edited from Jonathan Porritt’s speech at the South Downs National Park Outdoor learning conference March 2013:

“Most of my world is spent talking about great, big, abstract issues, and sometimes they’re lumped under the framework of sustainable development, sometimes under environment, sometimes under green politics, whatever it might be. Big, abstract, conceptual ways of looking at the world. The difficulty about this is that it can so often miss the mark when you try to explain what it really means!

I have two big things I would like to talk about today:

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